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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

ARE OROFACIAL PAIN PATIENTS PRONE TO OROPHARYNX RELATIONSHIP MODIFICATIONS, ALTERED RESPIRATORY PATTERNS OR SLEEP DISORDERS? FREE TO VIEW

Florence M. Sekito, MS*; Lucas N. Lemes, MD
Author and Funding Information

State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


Chest


Chest. 2005;128(4_MeetingAbstracts):385S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_MeetingAbstracts.385S
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  Determine if in orofacial pain patients there are differences of the Mallampatti classification indexes, respiratory upper airways preference and intensity flow or sleep problems in relationship to healthy controls.

METHODS:  The study design was transversal, analyzing 145 consecutive healthy patients enrolled at UERJ Faculty of Dentistry, without any previous history of smoking or respiratory disease. The Mallampatti index was calculated in layed position according to the traditional description. They were classified by clinical examination in 3 groups according their mode of breathing: nasal-breathing, oral-breathing, mixed-breathing (turns nasal or oral mode). All patients were submitted to the Epworth sleepiness questionnaire. Their respiratory airflow were measured by the Forced Oscillation Technique (FOT), Oscilab-version 2.0, from nose and from mouth at a frequency of 5 Hz, to determine the obstruction in naso and oropharynx.

RESULTS:  The Qui-square and Fisher exact tests were used. No statistical differences were found in relation to Mallampatti index, respiratory patterns and upper airways obstruction between orofacial pain patients and controls. Pain patients had clinical sleepiness determined by Epworth index.

CONCLUSION:  Orofacial pain has no effect on tongue position at oropharynx and does not alter patients breathing mode. Orofacial pain patients have sleepiness when compared to controls.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  There was not any reference at the literature about orofacial pain patients and breathing patterns, respiratory flow evaluations, sleep disorders or tongue position in relationship to oropharynx. As far as we know this is the first description that neuromuscular orofacial pain doesn’t cause any influence on these subjects. Variablep valueFrequencyCases (n=75)Controls (n=75)Mallampatti0,25113.33%112.00%228,00%217.33%358,67%370.67%Respiratory Pattern0,99162.67%162.67%25,33%26.77%332,00%330.67%Upper airways obstruction0.40156,76%163.51%243,24%236.49%

Mallampatti level: 1-normal; 2-parcial obstruction; 3- total obstruction

DISCLOSURE:  Florence Sekito, None.

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


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