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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

THE USE OF SPIROMETRY AND IMPULSE OSCILLOMETRY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF VOCAL CORD DYSFUNCTION IN THE PEDIATRIC PATIENT FREE TO VIEW

Shannon Boudreaux, MD*; Khalilah Lewis-Brown, MD; Glenn Hildreth, RRT; Kevin D. Maupin, MD
Author and Funding Information

University of Florida Department of Pediatrics/ Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital, Pensacola, FL


Chest


Chest. 2005;128(4_MeetingAbstracts):353S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_MeetingAbstracts.353S
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  The diagnosis of paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction is suggested by the patient’s clinical history. It is definitively made by observing the vocal cords via flexible laryngoscopy/bronchoscopy. Paradoxical vocl cord dysfunction can also be suggested by a flat inspiratory limb of the spirometry flow-volume loop. An increase in airway resistance via impulse oscillometry may also suggest paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of spirometry and impulse oscillometry in the diagnosis of pardoxical vocal cord dysfunction.

METHODS:  We retrospectively reviewed patient charts with a diagnosis of paradoxical vocal cord dysfuntcion that were seen in our Pediatric Pulmonary Clinic over a 6-month period. We reviewed fourteen charts for the following parameters; sex, inspiratory limb of the flow-volume loop, and airway resistance via impulse oscillometry. The diagnosis had been made by flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy performed on all the patients.

RESULTS:  Five(35.7%) of the patients were male and nine(64.3%) of the patients were female. All of the patients had a normal inspiratory limb of the flow-volume loop. All of the patients had a normal RAW.

CONCLUSION:  In this study, the inspiratory limb of the flow-volume loop and the airway resistance via impulse oscillometry were both normal.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  The inspiratory limb of the flow-volume loop and the airway resistance via impulse oscillometry are not useful in the disgnosis of paradoxical vocal cord dysfunction. The diagnosis should only be made by fiberoptic laryngoscopy/bronchoscopy.

DISCLOSURE:  Shannon Boudreaux, None.

Wednesday, November 2, 2003

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


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