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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

EXHALED NITRIC OXIDE IS INCREASED IN RESPONSE TO STRESS IN ADULT ASTHMATICS FREE TO VIEW

Jonathan S. Ilowite, MD*; Mary Bartlett, RN
Author and Funding Information

Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY


Chest


Chest. 2005;128(4_MeetingAbstracts):237S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_MeetingAbstracts.237S
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  Nitric oxide in exhaled air (FENO) is a marker of airway inflammation in asthma. This study was undertaken to determine whether FENO increases as a result of stress.

METHODS:  This study was a prospective, unblinded study in an office setting. 20 adult asthmatics were recruited to participate. Subjects were initially put into a relaxed state using a progressive relaxation technique. They were then put into a stressful state by asking them to complete complicated mathematical problems.

RESULTS:  FENO was measured using standard techniques after relaxation and after stress. Pulse was monitored during the stressful intervention. FENO significantly increased after stress. Mean +/-Standard Deviation (SD) for baseline FENO was 2.9 +/- 2.1. After stress, mean +/- SD FENO rose to 3.1 +/- 2.1. This was significant by paired test. (p= 0.03).

CONCLUSION:  A stressful situation can cause an immediate increase in the inflammatory state of the airways in adult asthmatics, as measured by FENO.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  This study provides insight into the mechanism in which a psychological stress could lead to worsening asthma.

DISCLOSURE:  Jonathan Ilowite, None.

Wednesday, November 2, 2005

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


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