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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

EVALUATION OF ANATOMIC BREATHING PATTERNS RELATED TO OBSTRUCTION AT NASOPHARYNX AND OROPHARYNX FREE TO VIEW

Florence M. Sekito, MS*; Lucas N. Lemes, MD
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State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


Chest


Chest. 2005;128(4_MeetingAbstracts):229S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_MeetingAbstracts.229S-a
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  The objective was to evaluate the clinical prevalence of nasal breathing mode, the most frequent one, and the presence of nasal obstruction. The obstruction sites (naso and oropharynx) and frequency in the oral-breathing mode and mixed-breathing mode were also evaluated.

METHODS:  The study design was transversal, analyzing 145 consecutive healthy patients enrolled at UERJ Faculty of Dentistry, without any previous history of smoking or respiratory disease. They were classified by clinical examination in 3 groups according their mode of breathing: nasal-breathing, oral-breathing, mixed-breathing (turns nasal or oral mode). Their respiratory airflow were measured by the Forced Oscillation Technique (FOT), Oscilab-version 2.0, from nose and from mouth at a frequency of 5 Hz, to determine the obstruction in naso and oropharynx.

RESULTS:  The Fisher exact test was used, with significant association between breathing mode and the obstruction level (p = 0,003). The oral-breathing occurred when there were obstruction (p=0,001) in nasopharynx (33.33%), and/or oropharynx (44.44%). The nasal and mixed mode were more frequent with the obstruction absence (68.54% and 53.19%, respectively).

CONCLUSION:  The breathing pattern had positive correlation with the obstruction site. The nasal and the mixed-breathing, may occur with some obstruction degree. The naso or oropharynx obstruction contributed significantly to oral-breathing mode.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  In the literature review, there wasn’t any reference about quantitative or qualitative methods to verify the relationship between the type of breathing and obstruction. This technique could testify this correlation significantly.

DISCLOSURE:  Florence Sekito, None.

Evaluation of the Clinical Concepts of Normal Breathing, Types of Breathing and the Obstruction in Nasopharynx and Oropharynx

Frequency%Nasal-BreathingOral-BreathingMixed-BreathingTotalNo obstructionn61 68.54%111.11%25 53.19%87Nasopharynx obstructionn1516.85%4 44.44%817.02%27Oropharynx obstructionn66.74%3 33.33%1021.28%19Naso and Oropharynx obstructionn77.87%111.11%48. 51%12Total89947145

Wednesday, November 2, 2005

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


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