0
Abstract: Slide Presentations |

RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF A SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION IN PATIENTS HOSPITALIZED IN A CARDIO-RESPIRATORY INSTITUTE FREE TO VIEW

Yves Lacasse, MD*; Rejean Lamontagne, MA; Sylvie Martin, MS; Marie Arsenault, MD
Author and Funding Information

Hopital Laval, Ste-Foy, PQ, Canada


Chest


Chest. 2005;128(4_MeetingAbstracts):204S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_MeetingAbstracts.204S-a
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

PURPOSE:  To determine whether a smoking cessation intervention of moderate intensity consisting of education and psychological support, with or without pharmacological therapy, associated with follow-up phone calls would increase the smoking cessation rate at 1-year follow-up in hospitalized smokers aged ≤ 70.

METHODS:  This randomized trial comparing a smoking cessation intervention to usual care took place at Laval Hospital, the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute. The intervention included: (1) a strong quit smoking message from the treating physician; (2) self-help motivational quitting or relapse prevention materials; (3) brief cessation counseling; (4) the use of nicotine replacement therapy when indicated; and (5) follow-up support. Patients in the usual care group were not given any specific instructions on how to stop smoking. Self-reported abstinence from smoking was recorded and validated by urinary cotinine measurement. The primary outcome was cessation rate at 1-year follow-up.

RESULTS:  468 patients were screened; 196 were randomized. We found no difference in smoking cessation rates at 12-month follow-up (intervention: 30%; control: 28%; number needed to treat: 41; lower bound of the 95% confidence interval: 13). Similar results were obtained from patients whose smoking status was validated at 12-month follow-up by urinary cotinine measurement (intervention: 33%; control: 35%). In logistic regression analyses, length of stay and dependence to nicotine were the only significant predictors of smoking cessation at 12-month follow-up.

CONCLUSION:  A smoking cessation intervention of moderate intensity delivered in a tertiary cardio-pulmonary centre did not increase the smoking cessation rate at 1-year follow-up.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  The effect of a smoking cessation intervention of higher intensity should be investigated. Recent studies suggest that enhanced follow-up after hospital discharge is a key element of a successful smoking cessation program.

DISCLOSURE:  Yves Lacasse, None.

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM


Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543