0
Original Research |

A National ICU Telemedicine SurveyICU Telemedicine Survey: Validation and Results

Craig M. Lilly, MD, FCCP; Kimberly A. Fisher, MD; Michael Ries, MD , MBA, FCCP; Stephen M. Pastores, MD, FCCP; Jeffery Vender, MD, FCCP; Jennifer A. Pitts, MA; C. William Hanson, III, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Medicine (Drs Lilly and Fisher), the Department of Anesthesiology (Dr Lilly), the Department of Surgery (Dr Lilly), the Clinical and Population Health Research Program (Dr Lilly), and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (Drs Lilly and Fisher), University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA; Advocate HealthCare, Rush University Medical Center (Dr Ries), Chicago, IL; the NorthShore University Health System (Drs Ries and Vender), Chicago, IL; the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (Dr Pastores), New York, NY; the Feinberg School of Medicine (Dr Vender), Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; American College of Chest Physicians (Ms Pitts), Northbrook, IL; and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (Dr Hanson), Philadelphia, PA.

Correspondence to: Craig M. Lilly, MD, FCCP, University of Massachusetts Medical School, UMass Memorial Medical Center, 281 Lincoln St, Worcester, MA 01605; e-mail: craig.lilly@umassmed.edu

Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST the following conflicts of interest: Ms Pitts is an employee of the American College of Chest Physicians. Drs Lilly, Fisher, Ries, Pastores, Vender, and Hanson have reported that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Funding/Support: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.


Funding/Support: The authors have reported to CHEST that no funding was received for this study.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2012;142(1):40-47. doi:10.1378/chest.12-0310
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  A recent ICU telemedicine research consensus conference identified the need for reliable methods of measuring structural features and processes of critical care delivery in the domains of organizational context and characteristics of ICU teams, ICUs, hospitals, and of the communities supported by an ICU.

Methods:  The American College of Chest Physicians Critical Care Institute developed and conducted a survey of ICU telemedicine practices. A 32-item survey was delivered electronically to leaders of 311 ICUs, and 11 domains were identified using principal components analysis. Survey reliability was judged by intraclass correlation among raters, and validity was measured for items for which independent assessment was available.

Results:  Complete survey information was obtained for 170 of 311 ICUs sent invitations. Analysis of a subset of surveys from 45 ICUs with complete data from more than one rater indicated that the survey reliability was in the excellent to nearly perfect range. Coefficients for measures of external validation ranged from 0.63 to 1.0. Analyses of the survey revealed substantial variation in the practice of ICU telemedicine, including ICU telemedicine center staffing patterns; qualifications of providers; case sign-out, ICU staffing models, leadership, and governance; intensivist review for new patients; adherence to best practices; use of quality and safety information; and ICU physician sign out for their patients.

Conclusions:  The American College of Chest Physicians ICU telemedicine survey is a reliable tool for measuring variation among ICUs with regard to staffing, structure, processes of care, and ICU telemedicine practices.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543