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To Repeat or Not to Repeat—That Is the Question!Serial Testing for TB: Serial Testing of Health-care Workers for TB Infection

Robert Loddenkemper, MD, FCCP; Roland Diel, MD, MPH; Albert Nienhaus, MD, MPH
Author and Funding Information

From the German Central Committee Against Tuberculosis (Dr Loddenkemper); Department of Pulmonary Medicine (Dr Diel), Medical School Hannover; and University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Dr Nienhaus), Institute for Health Service Research in Dermatology and Nursing.

Correspondence to: Robert Loddenkemper, MD, FCCP, German Central Committee Against Tuberculosis, Stralauer Platz 34, D-10234 Berlin, Germany; e-mail: rloddenkemper@dzk-tuberkulose.de

Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST the following conflicts of interest: Dr Diel has received travel reimbursement and/or fees for speaking at symposia sponsored by Cellestis Ltd, Oxford Immunotec Ltd, and Pharmore Ltd (exclusive supplier of Tuberculin RT23 for Germany). Drs Loddenkemper and Nienhaus have reported that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST the following conflicts of interest: Dr Diel has received travel reimbursement and/or fees for speaking at symposia sponsored by Cellestis Ltd, Oxford Immunotec Ltd, and Pharmore Ltd (exclusive supplier of Tuberculin RT23 for Germany). Drs Loddenkemper and Nienhaus have reported that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2012;142(1):10-11. doi:10.1378/chest.12-0045
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Extract

There is no doubt that the screening of health-care workers (HCWs) for latent TB infection (LTBI) and active TB should play an important role in infection control programs in hospitals and other health-care settings.1,2 TB risks appear to be particularly high in situations with ongoing exposure where inadequate infection control measures are in place.3 In their fundamental analysis of infection control measures in health-care settings from 1995, Menzies et al4 came to the conclusion that “there is an urgent need to evaluate their efficacy, feasibility, and cost effectiveness as well as their effect on the risk of transmission in various settings.”

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