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Original Research |

The Burden of Disease in Pediatric Non-Cystic Fibrosis BronchiectasisBurden of Disease in Pediatric Bronchiectasis

Nitin Kapur, PhD; I. Brent Masters, PhD; Peter Newcombe, PhD; Anne B. Chang, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Respiratory Medicine and the Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute (Drs Kapur, Masters, and Chang), Royal Children’s Hospital, Herston, QLD; the School of Social Work and Applied Human Sciences (Dr Newcombe), University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD; and the Child Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research (Drs Kapur and Chang), Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT, Australia.

Correspondence to: Nitin Kapur, PhD, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Children’s Hospital, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia; e-mail: dr.nitinkapur@gmail.com


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).

Funding/Support: This research was conducted with support from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council [Grant 545216] and a grant from the Royal Children’s Hospital Foundation to Dr Chang. Dr Kapur is supported by an Australia and New Zealand Trustees PhD Scholarship, an Endeavour Asia Award, and a Menzies School of Health Research scholarship.


© 2012 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2012;141(4):1018-1024. doi:10.1378/chest.11-0679
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Background:  The burden of disease in children with non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis is unknown. Our study aimed to identify the determinants of quality of life (QOL) and parental mental health in this group of patients and their parents and to evaluate the effect of exacerbations on these parameters.

Methods:  Parents of 69 children (median age 7 years) with non-CF bronchiectasis prospectively completed two questionnaires (parent-proxy cough-specific quality of life [PC-QOL] and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale [DASS]) at stable and exacerbation states. Data on clinical, investigational, and lung function parameters were also collected.

Results:  During the stable state, the median interquartile range (IQR) PC-QOL score was 6.5 (5.3-6.9) and the DASS 21-item questionnaire score was 6 (0-20). Being of a young age correlated with a worse QOL (r5 = 0.242, P = .04) but radiologic extent, lung function, underlying cause, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and chronic upper-airway disease did not influence these scores. Exacerbations caused significant worsening in the PC-QOL scores (median [IQR], 4.6 [3.8-5.4]; P = .001) and DASS scores (median [IQR], 22 [9-42]; P < .001; 38% with elevated anxiety, 54% with abnormal depression/stress scores during exacerbation). The presence of viral infection, hypoxia, and hospitalization did not influence the exacerbation PC-QOL and DASS scores.

Conclusions:  There is a significant burden of disease, especially during exacerbation, on parents of children with bronchiectasis. Prevention, early detection, and appropriate treatment of exacerbations are likely to reduce psychologic morbidity in this group.

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