0
Selected Reports |

Whipple Disease Revealed by Lung InvolvementWhipple Disease Revealed by Lung Nodules: A Case Report and Literature Review

Geoffrey Urbanski, MD; Philippe Rivereau, MD; Laure Artru, MD; Florence Fenollar, MD, PhD; Didier Raoult, MD, PhD; Xavier Puéchal, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Center for Rare Systemic Auto-immune Diseases (Drs Urbanski, Artru, and Puéchal), the Department of Rheumatology, and the Department of Respiratory Diseases (Dr Rivereau), Le Mans General Hospital, Le Mans; and Unité des rickettsies (Drs Fenollar and Raoult), Faculté de Médecine, Université de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France.

Correspondence to: Xavier Puéchal, MD, PhD, National Referral Center for Rare Systemic and Autoimmune Diseases, Necrotizing Vasculitides, Université Paris V-Descartes, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 27, rue du Faubourg Saint-Jacques, 75679 Paris Cedex 14, France; e-mail: xavier.puechal@cch.aphp.fr


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


© 2012 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2012;141(6):1595-1598. doi:10.1378/chest.11-1812
Text Size: A A A
Published online

We report the case of a man with a history of intermittent fever and arthritis who presented with a dry cough and associated lung involvement, who was eventually given the diagnosis of Whipple disease. The pulmonary symptoms preceded the development of GI manifestations. Five years later, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive macrophages were identified in duodenal biopsy specimens and polymerase chain reaction for Tropheryma whipplei was positive in the duodenum, stools, saliva, and cerebrospinal fluid. Pulmonary T whipplei was retrospectively confirmed by positive PAS staining and immunoreactivity to specific antibodies in endobronchial biopsy specimens. Antibiotic treatment was followed by remission. A literature review identified eight other cases of Whipple disease presenting with lung parenchymal involvement, predominantly interstitial lung disease (ILD), and without initial GI symptoms. In the absence of GI symptoms, a diagnosis of Whipple disease should be considered in middle-aged men presenting with ILD or lung nodules, if the patient has a history of unexplained arthralgia and/or fever. The association of mediastinal adenopathy or pleural effusion offers additional concern. Whipple disease may be fatal in the absence of treatment, but prolonged antibiotic treatment often leads to complete remission.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543