0
Correspondence |

Thoracic UltrasonographyThoracic Ultrasonography FREE TO VIEW

Jack A. Kastelik, MD; Anthony Arnold, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Respiratory Medicine, Castle Hill Hospital, Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, University of Hull and Hull York Medical School.

Correspondence to: Jack A. Kastelik, MD, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Castle Hill Hospital, University of Hull and Hull York Medical School, Cottingham, East Yorkshire, HU16 5JQ, England; e-mail: j.a.kastelik@hull.ac.uk


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2012 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2012;141(5):1366. doi:10.1378/chest.11-3067
Text Size: A A A
Published online

To The Editor:

We have read with great interest the article by Koenig and colleagues1 in CHEST (November 2011), in which the authors describe in a very enthusiastic and detailed manner the current understanding and the clinical use of thoracic ultrasonography by pulmonary specialists. In our institution, pulmonary specialists have been performing thoracic ultrasonography for a number of years, using a portable ultrasound machine to perform a large number of bedside thoracic ultrasonography procedures in respiratory outpatient clinic settings as well as for patients who are hospitalized.2 We found that the number of thoracic ultrasonography procedures performed by our radiology department has significantly declined as the result of the increase in the number of procedures being performed by respiratory specialists. We routinely use thoracic ultrasonography for the investigation of patients with pleural disorders and, more importantly, to guide pleural procedures such as thoracocentesis, chest drain insertion, or pleural biopsies.3 The use of thoracic ultrasonography assists in identifying a safe and suitable site for those procedures. It also improves the tolerability of pleural procedures for the patients and reduces potential complications.3

We would like to make a number of comments. Respiratory specialists should be able to perform thoracic ultrasonography as this improves the investigation and treatment of patients with pleural disorders and, more importantly, the safety of pleural procedures. However, there is a requirement for standardized training of respiratory specialists. A number of guidelines describe the basic competencies required.4 Then the ultrasonography skills need to be maintained and reinforced by regular practice on patients with a variety of pleural disorders. Mentoring by an experienced radiologist can be helpful, someone who can give feedback on patients with more complex pleural disorders. Respiratory specialists should be aware of their thoracic ultrasonography skills limitations and know when to ask for advice from an experienced ultrasonography specialist. Finally, we would like to highlight the fact that thoracic ultrasonography should be used in conjunction with the clinical history, examination, and other imaging modalities (such as chest radiography or thoracic CT imaging) as thoracic ultrasonography complements but does not substitute for those procedures and tests.

Koenig SJ, Narasimhan M, Mayo PH. Thoracic ultrasonography for the pulmonary specialist. Chest. 2011;1405:1332-1341. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Kastelik JA, Alhajji M, Faruqi S, Teoh R, Arnold AG. Thoracic ultrasound: an important skill for respiratory physicians. Thorax. 2009;649:825-826. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Lee WY, Faruqi S, Kastelik JA, Teoh R. Ultrasound guided pleural aspiration and chest drain insertion: prospective study. Eur Respir J. 2011;38suppl 55:61s
 
Royal College of RadiologistsRoyal College of Radiologists Ultrasound training recommendations for medical and surgical specialties. Royal College of Radiologists website.www.rcr.ac.uk/docs/radiology/pdf/ultrasound.pdf. Accessed March 1, 2012.
 

Figures

Tables

References

Koenig SJ, Narasimhan M, Mayo PH. Thoracic ultrasonography for the pulmonary specialist. Chest. 2011;1405:1332-1341. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Kastelik JA, Alhajji M, Faruqi S, Teoh R, Arnold AG. Thoracic ultrasound: an important skill for respiratory physicians. Thorax. 2009;649:825-826. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Lee WY, Faruqi S, Kastelik JA, Teoh R. Ultrasound guided pleural aspiration and chest drain insertion: prospective study. Eur Respir J. 2011;38suppl 55:61s
 
Royal College of RadiologistsRoyal College of Radiologists Ultrasound training recommendations for medical and surgical specialties. Royal College of Radiologists website.www.rcr.ac.uk/docs/radiology/pdf/ultrasound.pdf. Accessed March 1, 2012.
 
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543