0
Original Research: ASTHMA |

Pulmonary Function Testing in the Diagnosis of AsthmaPulmonary Function Testing in Asthma Diagnosis: A Population Study

Andrea S. Gershon, MD; J. Charles Victor, MSc, PStat; Jun Guan, MSc; Shawn D. Aaron, MD; Teresa To, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (Drs Gershon and To, Mr Victor, and Ms Guan), Toronto; The Hospital For Sick Children (Drs Gershon and To), Toronto; Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (Dr Gershon), Toronto; Department of Medicine (Dr Gershon), Institute of Health, Policy, Management and Evaluation (Dr Victor), and Dalla Lana School of Public Health (Dr To), University of Toronto (Dr Gershon, Mr Victor, and Dr To), Toronto; and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (Dr Aaron), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Correspondence to: Andrea S. Gershon, MD, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, G1 06, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON, M4N 3M5, Canada; e-mail: andrea.gershon@ices.on.ca


Funding/Support: Dr Gershon was supported by an Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Career Scientist Award. Dr To is supported by The Dales Award in Medical Research from the University of Toronto (Toronto, ON, Canada). Funding for this project was made available through the Government of Ontario. This study was also supported by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), which is funded by an annual grant from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2012 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2012;141(5):1190-1196. doi:10.1378/chest.11-0831
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Asthma is a common chronic respiratory condition, the diagnosis of which depends on symptoms and objective evidence of variable airflow obstruction or airway hyperresponsiveness. The proportion of people who have had objective pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis and factors associated with receiving testing are not well understood.

Methods:  A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the health administrative data of all individuals aged 7 years and older with newly physician-diagnosed asthma living in Ontario, Canada between 1996 and 2007. Receipt of pulmonary function testing in the peridiagnostic period was determined and examined across patient sociodemographic and clinical factors.

Results:  Only 42.7% (95% CI, 42.6%-42.9%) of the 465,866 Ontarians newly diagnosed with asthma received pulmonary function testing between 1 year prior and 2.5 years following the time of diagnosis. In adjusted analyses, individuals 7 to 9 years old and those 70 years or older were less likely to receive testing than younger adults, individuals in the lowest neighborhood income quintile were less likely to receive testing than those in the highest, and individuals seeing a medical specialist were more likely to receive testing than those seeing only a general practitioner.

Conclusions:  Less than one-half of patients with new physician-diagnosed asthma in Ontario, Canada received objective pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis. Further study is needed to determine why more pulmonary function testing is not being used to diagnose asthma and how barriers to its appropriate use can be overcome.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543