0
Original Research: ASTHMA |

Risk of Misdiagnosis, Health-Related Quality of Life, and BMI in Patients Who Are Overweight With Doctor-Diagnosed AsthmaQuality of Life in Obese Patients With Asthma

Stephen Scott, MB; Jacqueline Currie; Paul Albert, MBBS; Peter Calverley, MBBS; John P. H. Wilding, DM
Author and Funding Information

From the Clinical Science Centre, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool University, Liverpool, England.

Correspondence to: Stephen Scott, MB, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Countess of Chester Hospital, Liverpool Rd, Chester, CH2 1UL, England; e-mail: stephenscott2@nhs.net


Funding/Support: This work was supported by a project grant from Asthma UK.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2012 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2012;141(3):616-624. doi:10.1378/chest.11-0948
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Obesity and asthma both cause breathlessness, and there is a risk of misdiagnosis of asthma in patients who are obese. Impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and increased BMI increase physician attendance rates, increasing this risk. We explored the possibility of misdiagnosis and the relationship between BMI, HRQoL, and other traditional measures of asthma severity in subjects who were obese with a doctor’s diagnosis of asthma.

Methods:  Data were obtained from subjects who were overweight with physician-diagnosed asthma screened as part of another study, including bronchial provocative concentration of methacholine to produce a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) or reversibility to bronchodilators, HRQoL measured using generic (Short Form-36 [SF-36]) and disease-specific (St. George Respiratory Questionnaire and Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite) questionnaires. The fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (Feno), height, weight, and atopic status were also recorded.

Results:  Of 91 subjects (mean BMI, 38 kg/m2; mean FEV1%, 85.8%; mean FEV1/FVC, 70.0%; mean Feno, 25.1 parts per billion taking a mean chlorofluorocarbon-beclomethasone-equivalent dose of 1,273.5 μg/d), 36.3% had no bronchial hyperresponsiveness (possible misclassification of asthma diagnosis.) The BMI and HRQoL were significantly related: The St. George Respiratory Questionnaire total (r = 0.33, P < .001), SF-36 physical health subtotal (r = −0.42, P < .001), SF-36 mental health subtotal (r = −0.39, P < .001), and Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite total (r = 0.51, P < .001) showed no relationship to airways inflammation and bronchial reactivity. There was no significant difference in quality-of-life scores in subjects with or without bronchial hyperreactivity.

Conclusions:  We found evidence of misdiagnosis of asthma in subjects who were obese. The BMI in subjects who were obese and had asthma negatively correlates with the HRQoL, which may relate to the diagnostic uncertainty and requires further exploration.Trial registry: ISRCTN Register; No.: 54432221; URL: www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543