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Original Research: ASTHMA |

Fluticasone/Salmeterol Combination Confers Benefits in People With Asthma Who SmokeFluticasone/Salmeterol Benefits Asthmatic Smokers

Karine L. Clearie, MD; Lorna McKinlay, MBChB; Peter A. Williamson, MBChB; Brian J. Lipworth, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Asthma and Allergy Research Group, Centre for Cardiovascular and Lung Biology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Scotland.

Correspondence to: Brian J. Lipworth, MD, Asthma and Allergy Research Group, Centre for Cardiovascular and Lung Biology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland; e-mail: brianlipworth@gmail.com


For editorial comment see page 286

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).

Funding/Support: This study was funded from the university departmental fund of the Asthma and Allergy Research Group.


© 2012 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2012;141(2):330-338. doi:10.1378/chest.11-0392
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Background:  Smoking induces airway inflammation and relative resistance to inhaled steroids. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects on airway hyperresponsiveness of adding salmeterol to fluticasone vs doubling the dose of fluticasone in patients with asthma who smoked and patients with asthma who did not smoke.

Methods:  Sixteen patients with mild to moderate persistent asthma who did not smoke and 15 such patients who smoked completed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. They received either a fluticasone/salmeterol combination (FP/SM) (125/25 μg) two puffs bid (plus fluticasone placebo), or active fluticasone (250 μg) two puffs bid (plus FP/SM placebo), for 2 weeks each, with baselines after 1-week to 2-week run-in and washout periods. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in the provocative concentration of methacholine required to produce a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20).

Results:  In the patients who did not smoke, there were similar improvements in the methacholine PC20 with the use of fluticasone and FP/SM. The patients who smoked gained a benefit from FP/SM but not fluticasone, amounting to a PC20 difference of 1.6 doubling dilutions (95% CI, 1.0-2.2), P < .01. The provocative dose of mannitol required to produce a 15% fall in FEV1 (PD15) showed greater improvements with FP/SM than fluticasone in both patients who smoked and did not smoke. Similar differences in airway caliber between those who smoked and did not smoke were observed in FEV1 and airway resistance.

Conclusions:  FP/SM confers greater improvements in airway hyperresponsiveness and airway caliber in patients with asthma who smoke compared with double the dose of fluticasone. We hypothesize that in the presence of relative steroid resistance, the smooth muscle stabilization conferred by salmeterol is of greater clinical importance in patients who smoke than in those who do not smoke.

Trial registry:  ClinicalTrials.gov: No.: NCT00830505; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov

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