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Percutaneous Cryoablation for Pulmonary Nodules in the Residual Lung After PneumonectomyCryoablation After Pneumonectomy: Report of Two Cases

Yoshikane Yamauchi, MD; Yotaro Izumi, MD; Hideki Yashiro, MD; Masanori Inoue, MD; Seishi Nakatsuka, MD; Masafumi Kawamura, MD; Hiroaki Nomori, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Surgery (Drs Yamauchi, Izumi, and Nomori), and the Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Drs Inoue and Nakatsuka), School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo; the Department of Radiology (Dr Yashiro), Hiratsuka City Hospital, Kanagawa; and the Department of Surgery (Dr Kawamura), Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Correspondence to: Yotaro Izumi, MD, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; e-mail: yotaroizumi@a2.keio.jp

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


Chest. 2011;140(6):1633-1637. doi:10.1378/chest.11-0459
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Lung cancers in the residual lungs of patients who have undergone pneumonectomies are often unresectable, primarily because of the risks of overt pulmonary function losses. Percutaneous cryoablation of lung tumors is a potentially minimally invasive technique that has recently been used in the treatment of lung cancers and metastatic lung tumors. Here, we present two patients who had previously undergone pneumonectomies, in whom lung cancers in the residual lungs were treated by cryoablation. In both patients, the procedures were performed safely without any complications, such as airway bleeding, hemothoraces, or pneumothoraces. The changes in pulmonary functions after the procedures were minimal: % vital capacity (−1% and −4%), and %FEV1 (−1% and +10%) in the first and second patients, respectively. The performance statuses were maintained at zero in both patients after cryoablation. In the first patient, local control has been maintained for 4 years. In the second patient, local control was maintained for 2 years until the patient died of distant metastases. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of lung cryoablation in residual lungs of patients who have previously undergone pneumonectomies. Application of percutaneous cryoablation may represent a new treatment option for lung tumors in patients who have previously undergone pneumonectomies.

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