0
Editorials |

Reengineering Health Care via Medical Simulation ToolsReengineering Health Care via Medical Simulation: “Lions and Tigers and Bears. Oh My!”

William F. Dunn, MD, FCCP; Joseph G. Murphy, MD, FCCP; Amitai Ziv, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Simulation Center, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Dr Dunn), and the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases (Dr Murphy), Mayo Clinic; the Department of Risk Management, Quality Assurance, and Medical Education and the Israel Center for Medical Simulation (Dr Ziv), Chaim Sheba Medical Center; and the Medical Education Department (Dr Ziv), Sackler Medical School, Tel-Aviv University.

Correspondence to: William F. Dunn, MD, FCCP, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905; e-mail: dunn.william@mayo.edu


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST the following conflicts of interest: Dr Ziv is a consultant to Simbionix USA Inc, a medical simulation company. Within the past 3 years Dr Ziv was also consultant to CAE Healthcare, a medical simulation company. Drs Dunn and Murphy have reported that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2011 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2011;140(4):840-843. doi:10.1378/chest.11-1541
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

In this issue of CHEST (see page 854), the “Patient Safety Forum” section presents a provocative essay from two national leaders in British health-care innovation and change.1 They ask a simple but insightful question: Why is medical simulation being used only sporadically within their health-care systems as a safety and quality improvement tool, when there is overwhelming scientific evidence documenting the value of simulation in high-risk professions, including that of clinical medicine? Rarely do face value, conceptual agreement, and evolving scientific evidence provide as strong a case as that for simulation-based training in medicine. Dr Rajesh Aggarwal serves as clinical scientist and specialist registrar in surgery at Imperial College London. His colleague and coauthor, Professor the Lord Darzi of Denham PC, KBE, is Hamlyn Chair of Surgery at Imperial College London. He is a past health minister of the United Kingdom. Aggarwal and Darzi1 argue that if, as a society, we truly want the best health care, including the safest care (ie, ameliorating adverse events), then proactive use of intelligently selected and integrated medical simulation is an essential component. Simulation should be consistently used to select, train, credential, and revalidate health-care practitioners at all levels of training, crossing disciplines and professions. In their view, drivers for such fundamental system changes must come both from within and outside the profession. Is such a view realistic and attainable? Is this, like some distant Oz, a dream of idyllic fantasy, or is it indeed a realistic opportunity that can facilitate real, pragmatic, affordable, improved value in delivered care globally?

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543