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Abstract: Slide Presentations |

PREVALENCE OF SLEEP-DISORDERED BREATHING SYMPTOMS IN MOTHERS OF NEWBORNS IN NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE COMPARED TO MOTHERS OF NON-NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE INFANTS FREE TO VIEW

Ghada R. Bourjeily, MD*; Christina raker, DSc; Fadlallah Habr, MD; Lucia Larson, MD; Margaret Miller, MD
Author and Funding Information

Women and Infants’ Hospital of RI, Providence, RI


Chest


Chest. 2009;136(4_MeetingAbstracts):34S. doi:10.1378/chest.136.4_MeetingAbstracts.34S-f
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  Snoring during pregnancy is shown to be associated with a higher risk of preeclampsia and growth restriction. The goal of this study is to compare symptoms of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in mothers of newborns admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) compared to mothers whose newborns did not require such an admission at birth.

METHODS:  A cross sectional survey of symptoms of SDB was performed at a large obstetric hospital. Consecutive mothers of neonates admitted to the NICU were recruited to answer a questionnaire on symptoms of SDB and daytime sleepiness using a modified multivariable apnea prediction index and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Neck circumference was measured. Statistical analysis: Categorical variables were compared by Fisher's exact T-test and continuous variables were compared by T-test or the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The associations were summarized by odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS:  A total of 863 women were included; 101 NICU mothers and 762 non-NICU mothers. Among NICU babies, 16.4% were multiples, 64.6% pre-term and 59.1% had low birth weight. Mean age was comparable in the 2 groups. Mothers of NICU babies were more likely to be Hispanic than controls (OR 2.55, 1.54–4.22). There were no significant differences in pre-pregnancy body mass index, weight gain or neck circumference. NICU mothers were more likely to smoke (OR 2.83, 1.61–4.97) and had a higher likelihood of preeclampsia (OR 4.03, 2.14–7.61) and gestational hypertension (OR 5.82, 3.17–10.69). Snoring was prevalent in 42.1% of NICU moms compared to 33.3% in non-NICU moms with a trend toward statistical significance between snoring (OR 1.45; 0.9–2.32), gasping (OR 1.87; 1.0–3.5) and NICU status.

CONCLUSION:  Despite a previously described association between SDB symptoms and gestational hypertensive disorders, and a high prevalence of gestational hypertensive disorder in our NICU mothers compared to the non-NICU mothers, there was only a trend to a higher incidence of symptoms of SDB in the NICU group.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  Snoring in pregnancy is not a statistically significant predictor of NICU admission.

DISCLOSURE:  Ghada Bourjeily, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM


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