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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

EARLY GAIN IN BODY MASS WITH CONTINUOUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE THERAPY FOR OBSTRUCTIVE APNEA FREE TO VIEW

Anas Balaa, MD*; Ahmed M. Abugiazya, MD; Raymond Bourey, MD
Author and Funding Information

University of Toledo Medical College, Toledo, OH


Chest


Chest. 2009;136(4_MeetingAbstracts):70S. doi:10.1378/chest.136.4_MeetingAbstracts.70S
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  CPAP therapy of OSA is associated with decreased BMI, studies to date do not suggest a specific pattern, and overall, suggest long-term stability in body mass after one year. We have found that body mass increases in the majority of patients with OSA treated with CPAP for 4 weeks.

METHODS:  Retrospective analysis of 218 consecutive patients treated for sleep apnea at a community-based sleep center.

RESULTS:  152 patients met criteria for study conclusion. After 1 month of CPAP treatment, 119 subjects (78%) gained weight. Weight gain occurred in 81% of men and 73% of women. As a group, subjects on CPAP gained 1.4 ± 0.2 kg (mean ± s.e.). Epworth sleepiness scale was reduced after one month of CPAP therapy. There was no correlation between gain in body mass and measured parameters. A subgroup of 71 patients remained on therapy. They demonstrated gain in mass at 4 weeks, which did not persist at 6 months.

CONCLUSION:  CPAP treatment of OSA is associated with gain in body mass at 1 month but not after 6 months of therapy. Etiology and significance of this gain in mass remains unknown. We suspect some gain is due to increased vascular volume.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  Increase in body mass after one month of CPAP treatment of OSA, which does not persist after 6 months of treatment. Short-term change in body mass might be multifactorial, but we suspect an increase in vascular volume occurs soon after initiation of CPAP therapy. As visceral adiposity seems to decrease after 6 months of CPAP therapy, an increase in vascular volume could persist in the absence of a persistent increase in body mass. Short-term gain in body mass might represent an integrated measure of cardiovascular response to CPAP therapy, and prospective study should be undertaken to assess time course and physiological mechanisms.

DISCLOSURE:  Anas Balaa, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM


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