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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

COMPARISON OF MAXIMAL RESPIRATORY PRESSURES BETWEEN HEALTHY MALE HEAVY SMOKERS AND NONSMOKERS FREE TO VIEW

Stylianos A. Michaelides, MD*; Maria E. Michalatou, DPT; Andreas Asimakos, MD; George D. Bablekos, MD
Author and Funding Information

A. Fleming General Hospital, Athens, Greece


Chest


Chest. 2008;134(4_MeetingAbstracts):p146001. doi:10.1378/chest.134.4_MeetingAbstracts.p146001
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Abstract

PURPOSE: In this study we tried to investigate the effect of chronic smoking on respiratory muscle strength by determining and comparing maximal respiratory pressures (MRP) between a group of heavy male smokers (HSG) and a group of nonsmoking male controls (NSG), by determining maximal inspiratory and maximal expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP respectively).

METHODS: Fifteen healthy male heavy smokers (HSG) with a mean daily consumption of more than 25 cigarettes/day (aged 28±7.2 yrs. and a mean height of 176 ± 9.6 cm) and 15 healthy male non-smoking controls (aged 30 ±6.9 yrs. and a mean height of 178 ± 6.8 cm) were studied. All subjects had a negative medical history and physical examination, a normal chest X-ray and their spirometry was rated as within normal limits. They all had a recording of MRP with an electronic mouth pressure meter. Among 3 attempts the best value of MRP was recorded for the purpose of the study Comparisons were made by Student's t-test.

RESULTS: In HSG MIP was -101.4 ± 7.8 cm H2O (range 87 –116 cm H2O) while in NSG it was - 119.6 ± 6.4 cm H2O (range 106 - 133) (17.5% higher in the NSG, p< 0.01). On the other hand MEP in HSG was 127.5± 12.3 cmH2O (range 103 -153) while in NSG it was 132.7±11.4 cmH2O (range 96 –155, without statistically significant difference between the 2 groups).

CONCLUSION: Regular heavy smoking seems to be associated with rather lower maximal inspiratory pressures than those of non-smoking subjects without a statistically signifigant effect on maximal expiratory pressures and this might be independent of other consequencs on lung function.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: It seems that heavy smoking subjects may exhibit a small reduction in inspiratory muscle strength compared to non-smokers. This fact may be one of the components of the reduced exercise tolerance of smokers compared with non-smokers.

DISCLOSURE: Stylianos Michaelides, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM


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