0
Abstract: Poster Presentations |

DOES INSOMNIA PREDICT HYPERTENSION? A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS FROM THE CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH STUDY FREE TO VIEW

Barbara A. Phillips, MD*; Petra Bùžková, PhD; Paul Enright, MD
Author and Funding Information

Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep M2edicine, Department of Internal, Lexington, KY


Chest


Chest. 2008;134(4_MeetingAbstracts):p71001. doi:10.1378/chest.134.4_MeetingAbstracts.p71001
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

PURPOSE: We hypothesized that the sleep complaints of insomnia predict hypertension, particularly in African Americans. The purpose of this study was to analyze insomnia complaints as predictors of hypertension in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), stratifying by gender and allowing for race and sleep variable interaction.

METHODS: Design: This is a prospective secondary analysis of an existing dataset. Setting: This is a community-based study over a 6 year period of follow-up. Participants: The study analyzed data from 1419 older individuals (mean age 73.4 + 4.4 years) from the Cardiovascular Health Study who were not hypertensive at baseline. Interventions: noneMeasurements: We constructed Relative Risks (RR) of incident hypertension for insomnia complaints singly and in combination.

RESULTS: Difficulty falling asleep, singly or in combination with other sleep complaints, predicted a statistically significantly reduced risk of incident hypertension for non-African American men in 6 years of follow-up. Insomnia complaints did not predict hypertension in women or in African Americans, although there may not have been enough power to show a significant association for African Americans.

CONCLUSION: Insomnia does not predict hypertension. Difficulty falling asleep is associated with reduced risk of hypertension in non African American men.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: It is difficult to demonstrate that insomnia is causally associated with hypertension. Indeed, difficulty falling asleep predicts reduced risk of hypertension in non African American men.

DISCLOSURE: Barbara Phillips, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

1:00 PM - 2:15 PM


Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
The prevalence of restless legs syndrome in Taiwanese adults. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2010;64(2):170-8.
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543