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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF TWO EXPIRATORY PRESSURE REDUCTION SYSTEMS IN THE TREATMENT OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA FREE TO VIEW

Lisa Wolfe, MD*; Clifford A. Massie, PhD; Gökhan M. Mutlu, MD; Nancy Gordon, MS; Eileen Casal, RN, MSN
Author and Funding Information

Northwestern University, Chicago, IL


Chest


Chest. 2007;132(4_MeetingAbstracts):665b. doi:10.1378/chest.132.4_MeetingAbstracts.665b
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Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess whether two commercially available flow generators that reduce pressure during expiration have equivalent impact on respiratory events and sleep quality in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, single-blind, crossover, multi-center study of the S8 Elite Expiratory Pressure Relief (EPR) mode (ResMed) and the REMstar Pro C-Flex mode (Respironics). Among 88 adults, OSA-diagnosed patients screened for study eligibility, all experienced and compliant with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the C-Flex mode, 34 were eligible for participation. Titration studies utilizing C-Flex within the previous 12 months provided the baseline data. Subjects were randomized into two groups: one night on C-Flex mode followed by one night on EPR mode, or vice versa. After a desensitization period for subject acclimation to the EPR or C-Flex mode while awake, a polysomnography was conducted to obtain data on Apnea/Hypopnea Index, oxygen desaturation (percentage time below 90%), Arousal Index, and Sleep Efficiency. A visual analog scale was used to assess patient comfort.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two reduced expiratory pressure modes across all study variables, though mask leak was significantly lower with the EPR mode.

CONCLUSION: EPR is clinically equivalent to C-Flex in a controlled sleep laboratory setting. Less mask leak may influence CPAP utilization level.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Expiratory Pressure Relief is a new technology that is comparable to the existing C-flex technology and may be helpful in improving compliance with nasal CPAP due to its ability to decrease mask leak.

DISCLOSURE: Lisa Wolfe, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


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