0
Abstract: Poster Presentations |

THE INFLUENCE OF BREATHING PATTERN DURING NEBULIZATION ON THE EMITTED DOSE OF ARFORMOTEROL FREE TO VIEW

Andrea Bauer, PhD*; Paul McGlynn, PhD; Li Li Bovet, PhD; P. Mims, PhD; Lisa Curry, PhD; John Hanrahan, MD, MPH
Author and Funding Information

Sepracor Inc., Marlborough, MA


Chest


Chest. 2007;132(4_MeetingAbstracts):616b-617. doi:10.1378/chest.132.4_MeetingAbstracts.616b
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

PURPOSE: This in vitro study evaluated the influence of different breathing patterns on the emitted dose of nebulized arformoterol. Breath simulation experiments used a PARI LC Plus® nebulizer in combination with the Dura-Neb 3000® portable aerosol system. Patterns were selected to mimic the ranges that might be observed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

METHODS: Four breathing patterns with different tidal volumes (300-650 mL), breath frequencies (10-15 breaths/min), peak inspiratory flow rates (0.25-1.00 L/sec), and inspiratory to expiratory time (I:E) ratios (1:07-1:3.6) were studied using the Active Servo Lung, ASL 5000™. The dose of arformoterol on the inspiratory and expiratory filters, and the residual amount contained in the nebulizer bowl after an 8-minute nebulization period were determined by HPLC. The results are expressed as a percentage of the nominal dose (15 μg).

RESULTS: The inspiratory filter dose increased with longer inspiratory phase of tidal breathing (ranging from 8% to 13%), while the expiratory filter dose remained similar (8-9%) for all 4 breathing patterns. The total emitted filter dose (inspiratory and expiratory combined) for all patterns was <16-21% of the nominal dose. The maximum possible emitted dose of arformoterol, as defined by the amount not retained in the nebulizer bowl, did not exceed 6.42 μg of the nominal 15-μg dose for any of the 4 breathing patterns.

CONCLUSION: These breath simulation experiments demonstrate that only a small proportion (<25%) of the nominal 15-μg arformoterol dose is emitted from the nebulizer apparatus with the 4 breathing patterns studied.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: This study suggests that the emitted dose of arformoterol inhalation solution 15 μg in 2 mL would not be substantially impacted by different breathing patterns during nebulization.

DISCLOSURE: Andrea Bauer, No Product/Research Disclosure Information; Employee I am a full-time employee of Sepracor Inc.

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543