0
Abstract: Poster Presentations |

THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF ATHLETIC TRAINING ON PULMONARY FUNCTION IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FREE TO VIEW

Nitasha Gupta; Peter Guastella, MS
Author and Funding Information

Manhasset High School, Manhasset, NY


Chest


Chest. 2007;132(4_MeetingAbstracts):604b. doi:10.1378/chest.132.4_MeetingAbstracts.604b
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to see if respiratory muscles could be trained through athletic activity, and to see how different athletic activities affected lung function.

METHODS: A total of 79 students (52 males, 27 females) were tested for spirometric values of FVC and FEV1, measured in liters. Students with known pulmonary disease or smoking history were excluded from the study. There were 53 athletes (27 swimmers, 26 wrestlers) and 26 non-athletes who served as the control group. Each blew into a Vitalograph II Spirometer three times, and the best of the three trials was recorded. Data was statistically analyzed. Differences between and among groups were calculated with ANOVA and followed by a Sheffe post hoc test.

RESULTS: Results indicated that the pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1) of the athletes was significantly better than the control group. The mean FVC and FEV1 of the swimmers was 3.74±0.89 liters and 3.51±0.82 liters, respectively. The mean FVC and FEV1 of the wrestlers was 4.16±0.77 liters and 3.63±0.74 liters, respectively. The mean FVC and FEV1 of the athletic group as a whole was 3.95±0.85 liters and 3.57±0.78 liters, respectively. The mean FVC and FEV1 of the non-athletes was 2.84±0.61 liters and 2.71±0.56 liters, respectively. Analysis revealed that there was a statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in lung function between the non-athletes and the athletes. Amongst the athletes, the wrestlers were noted to have higher mean FVC and FEV1 values, however this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.149).

CONCLUSION: The study suggested that athletic training in high school students does improve lung function. However, there was no significant difference between the types of athletic training.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Participating in athletic activity, irrespective of the type, may have a beneficial effect on lung function in adolescents.

DISCLOSURE: Nitasha Gupta, None.

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
High altitude illness Przegl Epidemiol 2016;70(3):490-499.
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543