0
Abstract: Poster Presentations |

FACTORS AFFECTING THE OVERUSE OF STRESS ULCER PROPHYLAXIS IN PATIENTS IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT FREE TO VIEW

William W. Hope, MD; Thomas Schmelzer, MD; Aram Kim, BS; Jonathan Salashour, BS; M. C. Barrett, PharmD; Ronald F. Sing, DO, FCCP*
Author and Funding Information

FH Sammy Ross Jr Trauma Center, Charlotte, NC


Chest


Chest. 2007;132(4_MeetingAbstracts):564. doi:10.1378/chest.132.4_MeetingAbstracts.564
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

PURPOSE: Guidelines for the use stress ulcer prophylaxis in critically ill patients have been well documented, yet inappropriate use continues. The purpose of our study was to evaluate factors that contribute to the overuse of stress ulcer prophylaxis.

METHODS: A retrospective review of all intensive care unit (ICU) patients admitted over a two month time period from a single, tertiary hospital was performed. Appropriate and inappropriate use of stress ulcer prophylaxis based on evidence based institutional guidelines were documented and then compared based on admitting service specialty and level of training of person writing the order.

RESULTS: The study included 103 ICU patients (55.3% male). Average length of hospital, ICU, and ventilator days were 6.3 days, 2.9 days, and 1.3 days, respectively. Stress ulcer prophylaxis was inappropriately used in 40 patients (38.8%) and inappropriately withheld in 5 patients (4.9%) for an overall noncompliance rate of (43.7%). The average amount of time for the inappropriate use of stress ulcer prophylaxis was 4.1 days. Inappropriate use of stress ulcer prophylaxis was significantly related to specialty of admitting service (surgery 25.5% vs. medicine 50.0%, p=0.011) and level of training of person writing the order (attending 36.8% vs. resident 61.1%, p=0.037).

CONCLUSION: Noncompliance with institutional guidelines for stress ulcer prophylaxis remains a problem in ICU patients. Factors that increase the likelihood of the inappropriate use of stress ulcer prophylaxis include being admitted to a medicine service and the order being written by a resident physician.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Ongoing education remains the key to improve compliance amongst all physicians. Inappropriate use of pharmacologic agents has significant cost implications.

DISCLOSURE: Ronald Sing, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM


Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543