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Abstract: Slide Presentations |

RESIDENT PERCEPTION OF THE EDUCATIONAL AND PATIENT CARE VALUE FROM REMOTE TELEMONITORING IN A MEDICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT FREE TO VIEW

Adan Mora, MD*; Saadia A. Faiz, MD; Todd Kelly, MD; Richard J. Castriotta, MD, FCCP; Bela Patel, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX


Chest


Chest. 2007;132(4_MeetingAbstracts):443a. doi:10.1378/chest.132.4_MeetingAbstracts.443a
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Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess residents’ perception of remote telemonitoring with regard to the educational value it may contribute in their residency training and to improved patient care.

METHODS: An anonymous electronic survey was sent to 133 residents who train in the medical intensive care units (MICU) affiliated with The University of Texas Medical School at Houston. One MICU has telemonitoring provided by fellows and academic or private intensivists via VISICU system of eICU©. The other MICU does not have eICU© involvement but is staffed by the same cohort of residents.

RESULTS: Ninety-six residents (72%) responded to the survey, including internal medicine, internal medicine/pediatrics, emergency medicine, anesthesia and preliminary residents responded. Sixty nine (71.9%) had telemonitoring experience. Of those with telemonitoring experience, a majority of residents perceived telemonitoring improves patient care (82.3%), and improves the care they deliver to patients while on call (73.8%). The events/interactions in which at least 60% of the residents believed telemonitoring was helpful or of some benefit were: ventilator management (70%), initial management of an unstable patient (64%), code supervision (64%), management of acute respiratory change (62%), blood gas interpretation/ acid base management (62%), early goal directed therapy and guidance (61%) and respiratory failure recognition (60%). It was least helpful with end of life issues (45%) and supervision on line placement (42%). 62% of residents preferred to train in a unit with remote telemonitoring. Upon completion of residency, 66.7% of residents expressed a desire to have remote telemonitoring involved in the care of their patients.

CONCLUSION: Remote MICU telemonitoring in a residency training program was perceived by residents to have a substantial impact in their education and to improve patient care.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Remote telemonitoring contributes to bedside residency education in critical care medicine and is perceived by residents to improve patient care.

DISCLOSURE: Adan Mora, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Monday, October 22, 2007

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM


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