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Abstract: Poster Presentations |

EFFECT OF ANTIPLATELET THERAPY IN THE OCCURRENCE OF VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM: A STUDY IN PATIENTS WITH ATHEROSCLEROSIS FREE TO VIEW

Danai Khemasuwan, MD*; Stafan V. Neagu, MD; Young K. Chae, MD; Alejandra Carpio, MD; Shika Gupta, MD; Jorge Mora, MD
Author and Funding Information

Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA


Chest


Chest. 2009;136(4_MeetingAbstracts):145S. doi:10.1378/chest.136.4_MeetingAbstracts.145S-a
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Abstract

PURPOSE:  Arterial and venous thrombosis may share common pathophysiology based on inflammatory mediators and platelet activation. Antiplatelet therapy demonstrated efficacy in atherosclerosis, but in venous thromboembolism (VTE) is still debatable. The objective of this study is to investigate the association between the use of antiplatelet therapy in patients with history of atherosclerosis on the occurrence of VTE.

METHODS:  We conducted a retrospective, case-control study, reviewing 593 patients admitted to Albert Einstein Medical Center (AEMC), Philadelphia with a diagnosis of either myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Patients who had been treated with anticoagulation therapy before the first visit at AEMC were excluded. The occurrence of VTE, risk factors for VTE, and use of antiplatelet therapy (Aspirin or Clopidogrel) were recorded.

RESULTS:  The mean age of the entire study population was 67.8 years. 52% of the patients were female and 77% were African American. The overall incidence of VTE was 13%; and 82% (486/593) were on antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel or combined. Among patients on antiplatelet therapy, 11% (54/486) developed a VTE, compared to 22% (24/107) in the nonuser group [OR (odd ratio) 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25–0.74; P = 0.002] After controlling for factors related to VTE (smoking, history of cancer, and immobilization), antiplatelet use was still associated with low risk of developing VTE [OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.26–0.77; P = 0.004].

CONCLUSION:  In this study, the use of antiplatelet therapy appears to be associated with significantly reduced the occurrence of VTE. Further investigation is warranted to determine a protective of antiplatelet therapy.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:  Antiplatelet therapy may help to reduce the risk of developing venous thromboembolism.

DISCLOSURE:  Danai Khemasuwan, No Financial Disclosure Information; No Product/Research Disclosure Information

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM


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