0
Original Research: CYSTIC FIBROSIS |

Respiratory Microbiology of Patients With Cystic Fibrosis in the United States, 1995 to 2005

Samiya Razvi, MD; Lynne Quittell, MD; Ase Sewall, PhD; Hebe Quinton, PhD; Bruce Marshall, MD; Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs. Razvi, Quittell, and Saiman), Columbia University, New York, NY; Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York-Presbyterian (Drs. Razvi, Quittell, and Saiman), New York, NY; Sewall, Inc (Dr. Sewall), Bethesda, MD; the Department of Medicine (Dr. Quinton), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH; and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (Dr. Marshall), Bethesda, MD.

Correspondence to: Lisa Saiman, MD, MPH, Columbia University, Department of Pediatrics, 650 West 168th St, PH 4 West, Room 470, New York, NY 10032; e-mail: LS5@columbia.edu

*Currently at the Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital at Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.


Funding/Support: This study was funded by the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2009 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2009;136(6):1554-1560. doi:10.1378/chest.09-0132
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Numerous improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have occurred during the past 2 decades. We hypothesized that these changes could impact trends in respiratory microbiology.

Methods:  Data from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry were used to examine trends in the incidence and prevalence of bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with CF in the United States from 1995 to 2005.

Results:  The number of patients with CF in the patient registry increased from 19,735 in 1995 to 23,347 in 2005. During the study period, the reported annual prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa significantly declined from 60.4% in 1995 to 56.1% in 2005 (p < 0.001). The decline was most marked in children 6 to 10 years old (48.2 to 36.1%) and adolescents 11 to 17 years old (68.9 to 55.5%). Both the incidence (21.7% in 1995 and 33.2% in 2005) and prevalence (37.0% in 1995 and 52.4% in 2005) of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus significantly increased and the age-specific prevalence was highest in patients 6 to 17 years old. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S aureus increased from 0.1% in 1995 to 17.2% in 2005 and from 2002 to 2005 was highest in adolescents 11 to 17 years old. Both the prevalence and incidence of Burkholderia cepacia complex declined, while the prevalence of Haemophilus influenzae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans increased.

Conclusions:  Data from the patient registry suggest that the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens in patients with CF changed during the study period. Future studies should continue to monitor changing trends and define the association between these trends and care practices in CF.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543