0
Original Research: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH |

How Frequently Should Workplace Spirometry Screening Be Performed?: Optimization Via Analytic Models

Philip Harber, MD, MPH, FCCP; Jessica Levine; Siddharth Bansal, MD
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: From Occupational-Environmental Preventive Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Correspondence to: Philip Harber, MD, MPH, FCCP, UCLA Occupational Medicine, 10880 Wilshire Blvd, No. 1800, Los Angeles, CA 90024; e-mail: pharber@mednet.ucla.edu


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2009 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2009;136(4):1086-1094. doi:10.1378/chest.09-0237
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Our objective was to determine how to select the optimal frequency of workplace spirometry screening using diacetyl-exposed workers as an example.

Methods:  A Markov model was constructed to assess the likelihood of progressing from healthy status to early or advanced disease, starting from four different exposure levels, and performing longitudinal or cross-sectional interpretation of spirometry results over time. Projected outcomes at 10 years were evaluated to inform the optimal frequency of workplace spirometry testing.

Results:  The optimal screening interval depends on the population risk and is highly sensitive to the real-life impact (utility) associated with false-positive results (eg, related to the availability of alternative work). Screening interval is particularly important for high-risk individuals with rapid transition from early to advanced disease, where the 10-year prevalence of advanced disease would be reduced from 5.3 to 2.5% using a 6-month interval rather than a 12-month interval. Longitudinal test interpretation, based on observing trends within each person over time, is marginally preferable to traditional cross-sectional spirometry interpretation.

Conclusions:  There is no single best screening interval. For high-risk populations, annual testing may be too infrequent.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543