0
Original Research: LUNG FUNCTION TESTING |

BP Variability and Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in Relation to Forced Expiratory Volume: A Population-Based Study

Gunnar Engström, MD, PhD; Maria Gerhardsson de Verdier, MD, PhD; Magnus Dahlbäck, MD, PhD; Christer Janson, MD, PhD; Lars Lind, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From AstraZeneca R&D (Drs. Engström, Gerhardsson de Verdier, and Dahlbäck), Lund, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Sciences (Dr. Engström), Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; and the Department of Medical Sciences (Drs. Janson and Lind), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Correspondence to: Gunnar Engström, MD, PhD, AstraZeneca R&D, 205:3, 22187 Lund, Sweden; e-mail: Gunnar.Engstrom@astrazeneca.com


Drs. Engström, Gerhardsson de Verdier, and Dahlbäck are employed by AstraZeneca R&D. Dr. Lind has received research grants from AstraZeneca. Dr. Janson has no potential conflicts of interest.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2009 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2009;136(1):177-183. doi:10.1378/chest.08-2529
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases. This population-based study explored whether low FEV1 or low vital capacity (VC) is associated with autonomic dysfunction, as measured by spontaneous heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic BP variability (SBPV).

Methods:  SBPV and HRV were recorded during 5 min of controlled breathing in men and women who were 70 years of age. FEV1 and VC were recorded in 901 subjects. Of them, information on HRV and SBPV was available in 820 and 736 subjects, respectively. Measures of autonomic function, that is, SBPV in the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) domains, HRV, and baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS), were studied in sex-specific quartiles of FEV1 and VC.

Results:  Low FEV1 was associated with high SBPV in the HF domain. The mean SBPV-HFs were 5.2, 4.5, 4.1, and 3.8 mm Hg, respectively, in subjects with FEV1 in the first (low), second, third, and fourth quartile (p < 0.001 [for trend]). This relationship persisted after adjustments for potential confounding factors. Low VC was significantly associated with high SBPV-HF in the crude analysis but not after adjustment for confounding factors. Neither FEV1 nor VC showed any significant relationship with BRS, HRV, or SBPV in the LF domain.

Conclusion:  In this population-based study, low FEV1 was associated with high SBPV in the HF domain. It is suggested that high beat-to-beat variability in BP could contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in subjects with moderately reduced FEV1.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543