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Original Research: LUNG FUNCTION |

Association of Circulating Adhesion Molecules With Lung Function: The CARDIA Study

Bharat Thyagarajan, PhD; Lewis J. Smith, MD; R. Graham Barr, MD; Myron D. Gross, PhD; Akshay Sood, MD, FCCP; Ravi Kalhan, MD, FCCP; David R. Jacobs, Jr, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (Drs. Thyagarajan and Gross), Medical School, and the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health (Dr. Jacobs), School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care (Drs. Smith and Kalhan), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; the Department of Medicine (Dr. Barr), Columbia University, New York, NY; the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Dr. Sood), University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; and the Department of Nutrition (Dr. Jacobs), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Correspondence to: David R. Jacobs, Jr, PhD, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, 1300 South Second St, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454; e-mail: jacobs@epi.umn.edu


This study was supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts N01-HC-48047, N01-HC-48048, N01-HC-48049, N01-HC-48050 (CARDIA field centers); N01-HC-95095 (CARDIA Coordinating Center); and PF-HC95095 Reading Center (CARDIA Pulmonary Reading Center, subcontract to CARDIA Coordinating Center).

The authors have reported to the ACCP that no significant conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2009 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2009;135(6):1481-1487. doi:10.1378/chest.08-1753
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Background:  Systemic inflammation has been associated with reduced lung function. Adhesion molecules, such as intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and P-selectin, figure importantly in initiating the inflammatory response. We studied the association between ICAM-1 and P-selectin concentrations and lung function in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.

Methods:  Spirometry testing was conducted at years 5, 10, and 20. ICAM-1 and P-selectin were assayed at year 15.

Results:  Complete data were obtained from 2,455 participants. We first predicted year-20 lung function from year-15 ICAM-1 concentration data. After controlling for race, gender, height, age, physical activity, smoking status, alcohol intake, BMI, and asthma status, all taken at year 15, the year-20 FVC was 164 mL higher (p < 0.0001) and FEV1 was 164 mL higher (p = 0.0003) in the lowest ICAM-1 concentration quartile than the highest ICAM-1 quartile, whereas the FEV1/FVC ratio showed no association (p = 0.25). We then predicted the year-15 ICAM-1 concentration from year-5 lung function and change in lung function (year 10 − year 5). The year-15 ICAM-1 concentration was about 13 ng/mL higher in the lowest vs highest quartile of either the year-5 FVC (p = 0.01) or year-5 FEV1 (p = 0.005). Year-15 ICAM-1 concentration was unrelated to year-5 FEV1/FVC ratio. Greater loss in FVC and FEV1 (year 10 − year 5) also was associated with higher year-15 ICAM-1 concentrations. Associations between P-selectin and lung function followed a similar but weaker pattern to that observed for ICAM-1.

Conclusions:  These data suggest a bidirectional association between circulating adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1 and P-selectin, and pattern of lung function change in adults.

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