0
Editorials |

Should Intensive Care Medicine Itself Be on the Critical List?

William Dunn, MD, FCCP; Joseph Murphy, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Correspondence to: Joseph Murphy, MD, FCCP, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905; e-mail: murphy.joseph@mayo.edu


Dr. Dunn is affiliated with the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and Dr. Murphy is affiliated with the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

The authors have reported to the ACCP that no significant conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/misc/reprints.shtml).


Chest. 2009;135(4):892-894. doi:10.1378/chest.09-0038
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

The practice of critical care medicine is facing a future perfect storm, namely, increased demand for critical care medical services coupled with a relative shortage of physicians formally trained in critical care medicine, all in the setting of unprecedented health-care financial constraints. The demand for critical care medicine specialists is driven by an aging US population with a greater number of disease comorbidities than in earlier years; increasing therapeutic complexity; greater health-care expectations by the general public; and mounting evidence that the impact of critical care physicians is to improve both the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. The invited essay for the series “Transparency in Health Care” in this month's edition of CHEST (see page 1038) by Gajic and Afessa1 further extends the debate pertaining to an important and ongoing dilemma for health-care delivery and economics in the United States. Care of the critically ill is central to the practice of modern medicine and lies at the “tip of the medical survival spear” (pardon the inverted analogy). Taken together, ICUs and coronary care units account for > 50% of all hospital deaths. From a financial perspective, this amounts to > 1% of the gross domestic product of the United States.2,3

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543