0
Original Research: COPD |

Proteomic Analysis in Lung Tissue of Smokers and COPD Patients

Eun Joo Lee, MD, PhD; Kwang Ho In, MD, PhD; Je Hyeong Kim, MD, PhD; Sang Yeub Lee, MD, PhD; Chol Shin, MD, PhD, FCCP; Jae Jeong Shim, MD, PhD; Kyung Ho Kang, MD, PhD, FCCP; Se Hwa Yoo, MD, PhD; Chul Hwan Kim, MD, PhD; Han-Kyeom Kim, MD, PhD; Sang Hoon Lee, PhD; Chang Sub Uhm, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine (Drs. E.J. Lee, In, S.Y. Lee, Shim, Kang, and Yoo), Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul; Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine (Drs. J.H. Kim and Shin), Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan; Department of Pathology (Drs. C.H. Kim and H-K Kim), Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul; and Department of Anatomy (Mr. S.H. Lee and Dr. Uhm), Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Correspondence to: Kwang Ho In, MD, PhD, Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 126-1, 5-ga, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-705, Korea; e-mail: khin@kumc.or.kr


This work was supported by grant R21-2007-000-10058-0 from the National Research Resource Bank Program.

This work was performed at the Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/misc/reprints.shtml).


Chest. 2009;135(2):344-352. doi:10.1378/chest.08-1583
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Rationale:  Although cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for COPD, COPD develops in only a minority of smokers, suggesting a significant genetic role. To solve the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism, it is critical to understand genes and their final product, ie, proteins. We investigated the exclusive proteins from the lung tissues obtained from COPD patients using proteomics.

Methods:  Nontumorous lung tissue specimens were obtained from patients who underwent surgery for lung cancer. We included 22 subjects: nonsmokers (n = 8), smokers without COPD (healthy smokers, n = 7), and smokers with COPD (n = 7). Proteins were separated from their spots with two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). To validate the proteins from the above procedures, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were conducted.

Results:  Twelve protein spots from COPD group significantly increased or decreased compared with the other two groups were chosen for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Eight proteins were up-regulated in the COPD group as compared with the nonsmokers. Meanwhile, five proteins from the COPD group were up-regulated and five were down-regulated when compared with healthy smokers. Of these, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and thioredoxin-like 2 were significantly increased in the COPD patients by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. MMP-13 was mainly expressed in the alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes; however, thioredoxin-like 2 was primarily seen in the bronchial epithelium.

Conclusions:  MMP-13 and thioredoxin-like 2 in lungs increased in patients with COPD. MMP-13 was mainly expressed in the alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes. In contrast, thioredoxin-like 2 was primarily seen in the bronchial epithelium.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543