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Original Research |

8-Isoprostane in Exhaled Breath Condensate and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in Asthmatic Children and Adolescents

Mario Barreto, MD*; Maria Pia Villa, MD; Carla Olita, MD; Susy Martella, L Tech; Giovanni Ciabattoni, MD; Paolo Montuschi, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs. Barreto, Villa, and Olita, and Ms. Martella), Sant'Andrea Hospital, II Faculty of Medicine, University “La Sapienza,” Rome, Italy; the Department of Pharmacology (Dr. Montuschi), Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Hearth, Rome, Italy; and the Department of Drug Sciences (Ciabattoni), School of Pharmacy, University “G. D'Annunzio,” Chieti, Italy.

Correspondence to: Mario Barreto, MD, Clinica Pediatrica, Ospedale Sant'Andrea, Via di Grottarossa 1035–1039, zip code 00189 Rome, Italy; e-mail: mario.barreto@uniroma1.it

*Values are given as the mean ± SD (range); No. (%); arithmetic mean, lung function variables and 8-IsoP (95% CI), or geometric mean FENO (95% CI). FEF25–75 = forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC.

†p < 0.05 vs subjects without EIB.

‡p < 0.01 vs subjects without EIB.

*Values are given as mean (95% CI), unless otherwise indicated.

†Baseline FEV1 values are given as percentage of predicted. FEV1 after exercise values are the percentage of baseline values.

‡p < 0.05 from baseline values.

The authors have reported to the ACCP that no significant conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/misc/reprints.shtml).


The authors have reported to the ACCP that no significant conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

The authors have reported to the ACCP that no significant conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/misc/reprints.shtml).

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/misc/reprints.shtml).


Chest. 2009;135(1):66-73. doi:10.1378/chest.08-0722
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Background:  Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in the asthmatic child is associated with persistent airway inflammation and poor disease control. EIB could arise partly from airway oxidative stress. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) levels of 8-isoprostane (IsoP), which is a known marker of oxidative stress, might therefore be helpful for monitoring asthma noninvasively.

Methods:  We recruited 46 asthmatic children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age (29 boys), all of whom underwent lung function testing, measurement of the fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), and collection of EBCs for 8-IsoP measurement before and after exercise challenge. FENO was measured before exercise and 5 min and 20 min after exercise. Spirometry was repeated 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after exercise.

Results:  Baseline 8-IsoP levels (but not baseline FENO levels) correlated with the fall in FEV1 5 min after exercise (r = − 0.47; p = 0.002). 8-IsoP levels measured after exercise remained unchanged from baseline levels; conversely, FENO levels decreased in parallel with the decline in FEV1 at 5 min (r = 0.44; p = 0.002). The mean baseline 8-IsoP concentrations were higher in patients with EIB (n = 12) than in those without EIB (n = 34; 44.9 pg/mL [95% confidence interval (CI), 38.3 to 51.5] vs 32.3 pg/mL [95% CI, 27.6 to 37.0], respectively; p < 0.01). No difference was found in the mean baseline FENO between groups (with EIB group: 38.7 ppb; 95% CI, 24.5 to 61.1; without EIB group: 29.1 ppb; 95% CI, 22.0 to 38.4).

Conclusions:  Increased 8-IsoP concentrations in EBC samples of asthmatic children and adolescents with EIB suggest a role for oxidative stress in bronchial hyperreactivity.

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