0
Original Research: COPD |

The Chronic Bronchitic Phenotype of COPDChronic Bronchitis and COPD: An Analysis of the COPDGene Study

Victor Kim, MD; MeiLan K. Han, MD; Gwendolyn B. Vance, RN; Barry J. Make, MD, FCCP; John D. Newell, MD, FCCP; John E. Hokanson, PhD, MPH; Craig P. Hersh, MD, MPH; Douglas Stinson, MS; Edwin K. Silverman, MD, PhD; Gerard J. Criner, MD, FCCP; the COPDGene Investigators
Author and Funding Information

From the Temple University School of Medicine (Drs Kim and Criner and Ms Vance), Philadelphia, PA; University of Michigan School of Medicine (Dr Han), Ann Arbor, MI; National Jewish Health (Drs Make and Newell and Mr Stinson), Denver, CO; University of Colorado at Denver (Dr Hokanson), Denver, CO; and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Drs Hersh and Silverman), Boston, MA.

Corresponding to: Victor Kim, MD, 785 Parkinson Pavilion, 3401 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19140; e-mail: victor.kim@tuhs.temple.edu


Funding/Support: This study was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [Grants U01 HL089856 and U01 HL08989].

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2011 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2011;140(3):626-633. doi:10.1378/chest.10-2948
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Chronic bronchitis (CB) in patients with COPD is associated with an accelerated lung function decline and an increased risk of respiratory infections. Despite its clinical significance, the chronic bronchitic phenotype in COPD remains poorly defined.

Methods:  We analyzed data from subjects enrolled in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) Study. A total of 1,061 subjects with GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) stage II to IV were divided into two groups: CB (CB+) if subjects noted chronic cough and phlegm production for ≥ 3 mo/y for 2 consecutive years, and no CB (CB−) if they did not.

Results:  There were 290 and 771 subjects in the CB+ and CB− groups, respectively. Despite similar lung function, the CB+ group was younger (62.8 ± 8.4 vs 64.6 ± 8.4 years, P = .002), smoked more (57 ± 30 vs 52 ± 25 pack-years, P = .006), and had more current smokers (48% vs 27%, P < .0001). A greater percentage of the CB+ group reported nasal and ocular symptoms, wheezing, and nocturnal awakenings secondary to cough and dyspnea. History of exacerbations was higher in the CB+ group (1.21 ± 1.62 vs 0.63 ± 1.12 per patient, P < .027), and more patients in the CB+ group reported a history of severe exacerbations (26.6% vs 20.0%, P = .024). There was no difference in percent emphysema or percent gas trapping, but the CB+ group had a higher mean percent segmental airway wall area (63.2% ± 2.9% vs 62.6% ± 3.1%, P = .013).

Conclusions:  CB in patients with COPD is associated with worse respiratory symptoms and higher risk of exacerbations. This group may need more directed therapy targeting chronic mucus production and smoking cessation not only to improve symptoms but also to reduce risk, improve quality of life, and improve outcomes.

Trial registry:  ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00608764; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543