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Correspondence |

Pulmonary Diseases: First Cause of Mortality in the World FREE TO VIEW

Jose Luis Sandoval-Gutierrez, MD; Edgar Sevilla Reyes, PhD; Edgar Bautista Bautista, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Critical Care Unit (Drs Sandoval-Gutierrez and Bautista Bautista) and the Department of Immunology (Dr Sevilla Reyes), Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias.

Correspondence to: Jose Luis Sandoval-Gutierrez, Critical Care Unit, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Tlalpan 4502, Mexico City, Mexico; e-mail: sandovalgutierrez@gmail.com


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2011 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2011;139(6):1550. doi:10.1378/chest.11-0021
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To the Editor:

We read with interest the recent editorial on the “Year of the Lung” published in CHEST (December 2010).1 On its Web site, the World Health Organization2 lists the top 10 causes of mortality in the world as:

  • Coronary heart disease (12.2%)

  • Stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases (9.7%)

  • Lower respiratory infections (7.1%)

  • COPD (5.1%)

  • Diarrheal diseases (3.7%)

  • HIV/AIDS (3.5%)

  • TB (2.5%)

  • Trachea, bronchial tube, lung cancers (2.3%)

  • Road traffic accidents (2.2%)

  • Prematurity and low birth weight (2.0%)

For decades, these kinds of reports have suggested that cardiac and infectious illnesses are the main causes of death in the developed and developing world, respectively. If respiratory illnesses, including pneumonia, TB, and cancer in the respiratory system, among others, were grouped separately, the sum would reach 17% of all deaths and would be the top cause of death in the world.

The Year of the Lung, 2010, was proposed by several associations to raise awareness of and promote research into respiratory pathology after the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic.3 Perhaps it is necessary to call not for a year, but for a decade of study on the respiratory system, which is involved in so much morbimortality. Future accounts and developments in public health policies should take this view into account.

Guntupalli KK, Gutterman D, Raoof S, Markowski PA. 2010: the year of the lung. Chest. 2010;1386:1287-1288. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
World Health OrganizationWorld Health Organization The 10 leading causes of death. World Health Organization Web site.http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs310/en. Accessed December 15, 2009.
 
Year of the Lung. 2010: the year of the lung declarationYear of the Lung. 2010: the year of the lung declaration Year of the Lung Web site.http://yearofthelung.org/uploads/Document/9c/WEB_CHEMIN_5600_1260787644.pdf. Accessed May 3, 2010.
 

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References

Guntupalli KK, Gutterman D, Raoof S, Markowski PA. 2010: the year of the lung. Chest. 2010;1386:1287-1288. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
World Health OrganizationWorld Health Organization The 10 leading causes of death. World Health Organization Web site.http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs310/en. Accessed December 15, 2009.
 
Year of the Lung. 2010: the year of the lung declarationYear of the Lung. 2010: the year of the lung declaration Year of the Lung Web site.http://yearofthelung.org/uploads/Document/9c/WEB_CHEMIN_5600_1260787644.pdf. Accessed May 3, 2010.
 
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