0
Original Research: DIFFUSE LUNG DISEASE |

Severe Occupational Pneumoconiosis Among West Virginian Coal Miners: One Hundred Thirty-eight Cases of Progressive Massive Fibrosis Compensated Between 2000 and 2009

W. Alex Wade, MD; Edward L. Petsonk, MD, FCCP; Byron Young, RPFT; Idrees Mogri, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Drs Wade, Petsonk, and Mogri), Department of Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV, and Occupational Lung Center (Mr Young), Charleston Area Medical Center, Charleston, WV.

Correspondence to: W. Alex Wade, MD, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Box 9166, Morgantown, WV 26506; e-mail: walexwade@gmail.com


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2011 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2011;139(6):1458-1462. doi:10.1378/chest.10-1326
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Miners inhale dust at work and are at a risk for coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), a preventable and potentially fatal lung disease. After regulations were implemented in the 1970s, declines were reported in both dust levels and the prevalence of simple and advanced CWP until about 2001, when despite stable reported dust levels, disease levels sharply increased.

Methods:  A structured, retrospective chart review was performed to describe the demographics and disease progression for 138 coal miners with progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) whose claims were approved by the West Virginia State Occupational Pneumoconiosis Board between January 2000 and December 2009.

Results:  PMF, a complication of CWP, developed in 138 West Virginian coal miners at a mean age of 52.6 years after an average of 30 years work tenure. The time of progression averaged 12.2 years from the last normal chest radiograph until PMF was detected. Lung function declined sharply in both smokers and nonsmokers, averaging 87 mL/y for FEV1 and 74 mL/y for FVC. The board has confirmed 21 deaths in this group. The most common job activities were operating continuous-mining machines (41%) and roof bolting (19%). Virtually all of these miners’ dust exposures occurred after the implementation of current federal dust regulations.

Conclusions:  Contemporary occupational dust exposures have resulted over the past decade in rapidly progressive pneumoconiosis and massive fibrosis in relatively young West Virginian coal miners, leading to important lung dysfunction and premature death.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Pneumoconiosis in Rush Mat Workers Exposed to Clay Dye “Sendo” Dust*: Clinical, Radiologic, and Histopathologic Features in Seven Patients
Chronic Necrotizing Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Pneumoconiosis*: Clinical and Radiologic Findings in 10 Patients
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543