0
Original Research: PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTING |

The Nonspecific Pulmonary Function Test: Longitudinal Follow-up and Outcomes

Vivek N. Iyer, MD, MPH; Darrell R. Schroeder, MS; Kenneth O. Parker, MS; Robert E. Hyatt, MD, FCCP; Paul D. Scanlon, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Division of Pulmonology and Critical Care Medicine (Drs Iyer, Hyatt, and Scanlon; Mr Parker), and the Department of Biostatistics (Mr Schroeder), Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

Correspondence to: Vivek N. Iyer MD, MPH, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Gonda E18, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905; e-mail: iyer.vivek@mayo.edu


Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2011 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2011;139(4):878-886. doi:10.1378/chest.10-0804
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  The nonspecific (NS) pulmonary function (PF) pattern refers to a PF test with a normal total lung capacity (TLC), normal FEV1/FVC ratio, and a low FEV1, a low FVC, or both. Currently, no information is available regarding the long-term stability of the NS pattern or variables that predict changes in subjects with an initial NS PF pattern.

Methods:  From 1990 to 2005 we identified 1,284 subjects with an NS pattern on initial PF testing with one or more follow-up PF tests 6 months or more after the initial NS test result. Lung volumes, diffusing capacity, and spirometry data were analyzed. A multivariate, multinomial logistic regression model was used to study the association between different variables and the final PF pattern.

Results:  Overall, 3,674 PF tests were performed in 1,284 subjects over a median follow-up period of 3 years. At last follow-up, 818/1,284 (64%) subjects continued to show the NS pattern, whereas 208/1,284 (16%) showed a restrictive pattern, 191/1,284 (15%) an obstructive pattern, 42/1,284 (3%) a normal pattern, and 25/1,284 (2%) a mixed pattern. The multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that increasing values for specific airway resistance and the difference between TLC and alveolar volume were predictors of a change to an obstructive pattern on follow-up.

Conclusions:  The NS pattern is a distinct and stable PF test pattern with roughly two-thirds of patients continuing to show this pattern on follow-up testing. Current interpretation guidelines erroneously label the NS pattern as representing obstruction and need to be changed to reflect these data.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543