0
Original Research: DIFFUSE LUNG DISEASE |

Vitamin D Deficiency and Reduced Lung Function in Connective Tissue-Associated Interstitial Lung Diseases

Jared T. Hagaman, MD; Ralph J. Panos, MD, FCCP; Francis X. McCormack, MD, FCCP; Charuhas V. Thakar, MD; Kathryn A. Wikenheiser-Brokamp, MD, PhD; Ralph T. Shipley, MD; Brent W. Kinder, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

From the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine (Drs Hagaman, Panos, McCormack, and Kinder), and the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension (Dr Thakar), Department of Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and the Cincinnati Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center; and the Department of Pathology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (Dr Wikenheiser-Brokamp), and the Department of Radiology (Dr Shipley), University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.

Correspondence to: Brent W. Kinder, MD, FCCP, 231 Albert Sabin Way, ML 0564, Cincinnati, OH 45267; e-mail: brent.kinder@uc.edu


These data were presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, on May 16, 2010.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).

Funding/Support: This study was supported by the National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute [award number K23HL094532] and a National Institutes of Health Clinical Research Loan Repayment Grant (Dr Kinder).


© 2011 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2011;139(2):353-360. doi:10.1378/chest.10-0968
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Vitamin D is a steroid hormone with pleiotropic effects including immune system modulation, lung tissue remodeling, and bone health. Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in the development of autoimmune diseases. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a cohort of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) and hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency would be associated with an underlying connective tissue disease (CTD) and reduced lung function.

Methods:  Patients in the University of Cincinnati ILD Center database were evaluated for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels as part of a standardized protocol. Regression analysis evaluated associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and other variables.

Results:  One hundred eighteen subjects were included (67 with CTD-ILD, 51 with other forms of ILD). The overall prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in the study population was 38% and 59%, respectively. Those with CTD-ILD were more likely to have vitamin D deficiency (52% vs 20%, P < .0001) and insufficiency (79% vs 31%, P < .0001) than other forms of ILD. Diminished FVC was associated with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels (P = .01). The association between vitamin D insufficiency and CTD-ILD persisted (OR, 11.8; P < .0001) after adjustment for potential confounders. Among subjects with CTD-ILD, reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were strongly associated with reduced lung function (FVC, P = .015; diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, P = .004).

Conclusions:  There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with ILD, particularly those with CTD-ILD, and it is associated with reduced lung function. Vitamin D may have a role in the pathogenesis of CTD-ILD.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543