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Workshop on Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis in Older Adults

Richard J. Castriotta, MD, FCCP; Basil A. Eldadah, MD, PhD; W. Michael Foster, PhD; Jeffrey B. Halter, MD; William R. Hazzard, MD; James P. Kiley, PhD; Talmadge E. King, Jr, MD, FCCP; Frances McFarland Horne, PhD; Susan G. Nayfield, MD; Herbert Y. Reynolds, MD; Kenneth E. Schmader, MD; Galen B. Toews, MD, FCCP; Kevin P. High, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (Dr Castriotta), Houston, TX; the National Institute on Aging (Dr Eldadah), Bethesda, MD; the Duke University School of Medicine (Dr Foster), Durham, NC; the University of Michigan Medical School (Drs Halter and Toews), Ann Arbor, MI; the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System (Dr Hazzard), Seattle, WA; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (Drs Kiley and Reynolds), Bethesda, MD; the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine (Dr King), San Francisco, CA; the Association of Specialty Professors (Dr Horne), Washington, DC; the University of Florida School of Medicine (Dr Nayfield), Gainesville, FL; the Duke University Medical Center and GRECC Durham VA Medical Center (Dr Schmader), Durham, NC; and the Wake Forest University School of Medicine (Dr High), Winston-Salem, NC.

Correspondence to: Kevin P. High, MD, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Section on Infectious Diseases, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC 27157; e-mail: khigh@wfubmc.edu


*A complete list of workshop participants is located in the e-Appendix 1.

Funding/Support: This workshop was supported by a grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation to the Association of Specialty Professors [Grant 2006-0239].

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;138(3):693-703. doi:10.1378/chest.09-3006
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Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a heterogeneous disease with respect to clinical presentation and rates of progression, disproportionately affects older adults. The diagnosis of IPF is descriptive, based on clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic examination, and definitive diagnosis is hampered by poor interobserver agreement and lack of a consensus definition. There are no effective treatments. Cellular, molecular, genetic, and environmental risk factors have been identified for IPF, but the initiating event and the characteristics of preclinical stages are not known. IPF is predominantly a disease of older adults, and the processes underlying normal aging might significantly influence the development of IPF. Yet, the biology of aging and the principles of medical care for this population have been typically ignored in basic, translational, or clinical IPF research. In August 2009, the Association of Specialty Professors, in collaboration with the American College of Chest Physicians, the American Geriatrics Society, the National Institute on Aging, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, held a workshop, summarized herein, to review what is known, to identify research gaps at the interface of aging and IPF, and to suggest priority areas for future research. Efforts to answer the questions identified will require the integration of geriatrics, gerontology, and pulmonary research, but these efforts have great potential to improve care for patients with IPF.

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