0
Original Research: ASTHMA |

Effects of Aerobic Training on Psychosocial Morbidity and Symptoms in Patients With Asthma: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Felipe A. R. Mendes, MSc; Raquel C. Gonçalves, MSc; Maria P. T. Nunes, MD; Beatriz M. Saraiva-Romanholo, PhD; Alberto Cukier, MD; Rafael Stelmach, MD; Wilson Jacob-Filho, MD; Milton A. Martins, MD; Celso R. F. Carvalho, PhD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Physical Therapy (Mr Mendes, Ms Gonçalves, and Dr Carvalho), Department of Medicine (Drs Nunes, Saraiva-Romanholo, and Martins), Department of Pulmonary Diseases (Drs Cukier and Stelmach), and Department of Geriatrics (Dr Jacob-Filho), School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Correspondence to: Celso R. F. Carvalho, PhD, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Av Dr Arnaldo 455, Rm 1210, São Paulo SP, 01246-903 Brazil; e-mail: cscarval@usp.br


Funding/Support: This work was supported by Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa de São Paulo (grants 02/08422-7 and 07/56937-0) and Conselho Nacional de Pesquisa (grants 480869/04-9).

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;138(2):331-337. doi:10.1378/chest.09-2389
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Asthma symptoms reduce patients’ daily activities, impair their health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and increase their reports of anxiety and depression, all of which seem to be related to a decrease in asthma control. Aerobic exercise training is known to improve aerobic fitness and reduce dyspnea in asthmatics; however, its effect in reducing psychologic distress and symptoms remains poorly understood. We evaluated the role of an aerobic training program in improving HRQoL (primary aim) and reducing psychologic distress and asthma symptoms (secondary aims) for patients with moderate or severe persistent asthma.

Methods:  A total of 101 patients were randomly assigned to either a control group or an aerobic training group and studied during the period between medical consultations. Control group patients (educational program plus breathing exercises) (n = 51) and training group patients (educational program plus breathing exercises plus aerobic training) (n = 50) were followed twice a week during a 3-month period. HRQoL and levels of anxiety and depression were quantified before and after treatment. Asthma symptoms were evaluated monthly.

Results:  At 3 months, the domains (physical limitations, frequency of symptoms, and psychosocial) and total scores of HRQoL significantly improved only in the training group patients (P < .001); the number of asthma-symptom-free days and anxiety and depression levels also significantly improved in this group (P < .001). In addition, a linear relationship between improvement in aerobic capacity and the days without asthma symptoms was observed (r = 0.47; P < .01).

Conclusions:  Our results suggest that aerobic training can play an important role in the clinical management of patients with persistent asthma. Further, they may be especially useful for patients with higher degrees of psychosocial distress.

Trial registration:  clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT-00989365

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Topics

asthma

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543