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Correspondence |

Previously Reported Lung Cancer Growth Curves FREE TO VIEW

Ryutaro Kakinuma, MD; Noriyuki Moriyama, MD; Kenji Eguchi, MD; Hironobu Ohmatsu, MD; Nobuhiko Seki, MD; Masahiro Kaneko, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the National Cancer Center, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening.

Correspondence to: Ryutaro Kakinuma, MD, National Cancer Center, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045 Japan; e-mail: rkaki@ncc.go.jp


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;137(4):1002-1003. doi:10.1378/chest.09-2410
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To the Editor:

The article by Lindell et al1 documenting the growth curves of 18 lung cancers that was recently published in CHEST (December 2009) is a well-designed and well-written study of the natural history of lung cancer. The results indicated that the growth of some of the lung cancers was not exponential and that their growth during certain intervals was not predictive of their future growth. Although the conclusion of the abstract states that this study was the first to document the growth curves of individual lung cancers, we would like to draw the authors’ attention to the fact that the individual growth curves of 13 lung cancers had been documented in the January 2008 issue of Clinical Radiology.2

It would have been most beneficial, therefore, if the authors had included a discussion of the growth curve results reported in the earlier article. The authors of the Clinical Radiology article did not interpret the growth curves of the 13 lung cancers in detail, but the growth curve for each lung cancer was graphically depicted in their Figure 5. A case report published in the Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery in 2007 also described the growth curve of a minute small cell lung cancer that exhibited a latent phase in its early growth period.3

In regard to the nonexponential growth of lung cancers, at least two previous articles4,5 have reported no growth or a decrease in volume during the progression of certain lung cancers. Although neither article specifically stated that such lung cancers were not limited to exponential growth, based on the changes observed, the authors inferred that the growth of some of the lung cancers was not exponential.

In the introduction of their article, Lindell et al1 make a point of stating that “No studies have documented growth dynamics of screening-detected, untreated, subclinical lung cancers on computed tomography (CT).” With all due respect to the authors, we cannot agree with this statement, because at least two earlier articles4,5 have reported progression of CT scan screening-detected, untreated, subclinical lung cancers.

Lindell RM, Hartman TE, Swensen SJ, Jett JR, Midthun DE, Mandrekar JN. 5-Year lung cancer screening experience: growth curves of 18 lung cancers compared to histologic type, CT attenuation, stage, survival, and size. Chest. 2009;1366:1586-1595. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Quint LE, Cheng J, Schipper M, Chang AC, Kalemkerian G. Lung lesion doubling times: values and variability based on method of volume determination. Clin Radiol. 2008;631:41-48. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Nakamura H, Kawasaki N, Taguchi M, Kitamura H. A minute small-cell lung cancer showing a latent phase early in growth. Ann Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2007;134:254-257. [PubMed]
 
Takashima S, Maruyama Y, Hasegawa M, et al. CT findings and progression of small peripheral lung neoplasms having a replacement growth pattern. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2003;1803:817-826. [PubMed]
 
Kakinuma R, Ohmatsu H, Kaneko M, et al. Progression of focal pure ground-glass opacity detected by low-dose helical computed tomography screening for lung cancer. J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2004;281:17-23. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

Figures

Tables

References

Lindell RM, Hartman TE, Swensen SJ, Jett JR, Midthun DE, Mandrekar JN. 5-Year lung cancer screening experience: growth curves of 18 lung cancers compared to histologic type, CT attenuation, stage, survival, and size. Chest. 2009;1366:1586-1595. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Quint LE, Cheng J, Schipper M, Chang AC, Kalemkerian G. Lung lesion doubling times: values and variability based on method of volume determination. Clin Radiol. 2008;631:41-48. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Nakamura H, Kawasaki N, Taguchi M, Kitamura H. A minute small-cell lung cancer showing a latent phase early in growth. Ann Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2007;134:254-257. [PubMed]
 
Takashima S, Maruyama Y, Hasegawa M, et al. CT findings and progression of small peripheral lung neoplasms having a replacement growth pattern. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2003;1803:817-826. [PubMed]
 
Kakinuma R, Ohmatsu H, Kaneko M, et al. Progression of focal pure ground-glass opacity detected by low-dose helical computed tomography screening for lung cancer. J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2004;281:17-23. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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