0
Original Research: ASTHMA |

Asthma and Serious Psychological Distress: Prevalence and Risk Factors Among US Adults, 2001-2007

Emeka Oraka, MPH; Michael E. King, PhD; David B. Callahan, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Mr Oraka, Drs King and Callahan), National Center for Environmental Health, Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch, Atlanta, GA; and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (Mr Oraka), Oak Ridge, TN.

Correspondence to: Emeka Oraka, MPH, Bldg 106, 4770 Buford Hwy, Chamblee, GA 30341; e-mail: eoraka@cdc.gov


Funding/Support: This work was performed and funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;137(3):609-616. doi:10.1378/chest.09-1777
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  For millions of adults, effective control of asthma requires a regimen of care that may be compromised by psychological factors, such as anxiety and depression. This study estimated the prevalence and risk factors for serious psychological distress (SPD) and explored their relationship to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among adults with asthma in the United States.

Methods:  We analyzed data from 186,738 adult respondents from the 2001-2007 US National Health Interview Survey. We calculated weighted average prevalence estimates of current asthma and SPD by demographic characteristics and health-related factors. We used logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios for factors that may have predicted asthma, SPD, and HRQOL.

Results:  From 2001 to 2007, the average annual prevalence of current asthma was 7.0% and the average prevalence of SPD was 3.0%. Among adults with asthma, the prevalence of SPD was 7.5% (95% CI, 7.0%-8.1%). A negative association between HRQOL and SPD was found for all adults, independent of asthma status. A similar pattern of risk factors predicted SPD and the co-occurrence of SPD and asthma, although adults with asthma who reported lower socioeconomic status, a history of smoking or alcohol use, and more comorbid chronic conditions had significantly higher odds of SPD.

Conclusion:  This research suggests the importance of mental health screening for persons with asthma and the need for clinical and community-based interventions to target modifiable lifestyle factors that contribute to psychological distress and make asthma worse.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Topics

asthma

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543