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Jean-Marc Naccache, MD; Isabelle Monnet, MD; François Guillon, MD; Dominique Valeyre, MD
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From the Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital Universitaire Avicenne, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (Drs Naccache, Guillon, and Valeyre); and the Service de Pneumologie et de Pathologie Professionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Créteil (Dr Monnet).

Correspondence to: Jean-Marc Naccache, MD, Université Paris 13, UPRES-EA 2363, Hôpital Universitaire Avicenne, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Bobigny, France; e-mail: jean-marc.naccache@avc.aphp.fr


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American Collessge of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;137(2):504-505. doi:10.1378/chest.09-2823
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To the Editor:

We are responding to the issue raised by Chua and Mehta regarding the new disease entity, anthracofibrosis, and its terminology. Anthracofibrosis is defined by bronchial luminal narrowing with black pigmentation of the overlying mucosa. TB was the most likely cause. Recently, mineral dust exposure and other factors have been added to the causes of anthracofibrosis.1,2

Chua and Mehta propose a new term, “anthracostenosis,” distinguishing anthracofibrosis associated with pneumoconiosis and other causes of anthracofibrosis. However, anthracofibrosis is a single clinicopathologic entity, and introduction of a new name could cause confusion. Bronchial anthracosis corresponds to black pigmentation and is a common finding. Semantically, in anthracostenosis, it could be argued that there is some stenosis by the anthracotic component. In fact, pathologic analysis of anthracofibrosis revealed bronchial and/or peribronchial fibrosis where the causative factor can be found (ie, granulomatous inflammation, mineral dust).1,3

The question of what this entity should be called is probably unimportant provided the nature of the disease is understood. Nonetheless, in our opinion, accuracy and logic favor the term “bronchial anthracofibrosis” because of the previous literature reports and the pathologic process.

Naccache JM, Monnet I, Nunes H, et al. Anthracofibrosis attributed to mixed mineral dust exposure: report of three cases. Thorax. 2008;637:655-657. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Wynn GJ, Turkington PM, O’Driscoll BR. Anthracofibrosis, bronchial stenosis with overlying anthracotic mucosa: possibly a new occupational lung disorder: a series of seven cases from one UK hospital. Chest. 2008;1345:1069-1073. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Chung MP, Lee KS, Han J, et al. Bronchial stenosis due to anthracofibrosis. Chest. 1998;1132:344-350. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

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References

Naccache JM, Monnet I, Nunes H, et al. Anthracofibrosis attributed to mixed mineral dust exposure: report of three cases. Thorax. 2008;637:655-657. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Wynn GJ, Turkington PM, O’Driscoll BR. Anthracofibrosis, bronchial stenosis with overlying anthracotic mucosa: possibly a new occupational lung disorder: a series of seven cases from one UK hospital. Chest. 2008;1345:1069-1073. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
Chung MP, Lee KS, Han J, et al. Bronchial stenosis due to anthracofibrosis. Chest. 1998;1132:344-350. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
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