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Correspondence |

Caution Advised With Use of Fospropofol FREE TO VIEW

Thomas Fuhrman, MD, MMSc, FCCP
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From the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami.

Correspondence to: Thomas Fuhrman, MD, MMSc, FCCP, Professor of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, 161 NW 12th Ave, Central 300, Miami, FL 33136; e-mail: tfuhrman@med.miami.edu


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The author has reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;137(1):234. doi:10.1378/chest.09-0299
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To the Editor:

In the January 2009 issue of CHEST, Michael A. Jantz, MD, FCCP, reviewed the issue of sedation during bronchoscopy.1 I certainly agree with the gist of the editorial until the concluding paragraph. The last line of the editorial reads: “Based on the available data, fospropofol appears to be safe for moderate sedation and should not require anesthesia monitoring.” The clinical experiences described by Dr Jantz certainly give the impression of the appropriateness of his comment. However, the following is from the labeling for fospropofol (LUSEDRA) as approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on December 12, 20082:

LUSEDRA should be administered only by persons trained in the administration of general anesthesia and not involved in the conduct of the diagnostic or therapeutic procedure. Sedated patients should be continuously monitored, and facilities for maintenance of a patent airway, providing artificial ventilation, administering supplemental oxygen, and instituting cardiovascular resuscitation must be immediately available. Patients should be continuously monitored during sedation and through the recovery process for early signs of hypotension, apnea, airway obstruction, and/or oxygen desaturation.

As further clinical evidence is accumulated, the FDA may see fit to modify the labeling for fospropofol. Future clinical studies performed to establish the clinical safety of fospropofol will need to adhere to the FDA’s labeling as should clinicians performing bronchoscopy with sedation provided by fospropofol.

Jantz MA. The old and the new of sedation for bronchoscopy. Chest. 2009;1351:4-6. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
 Lusedra [package insert]. 2008; Research Triangle Park, NC Eisai Corp
 

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References

Jantz MA. The old and the new of sedation for bronchoscopy. Chest. 2009;1351:4-6. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
 Lusedra [package insert]. 2008; Research Triangle Park, NC Eisai Corp
 
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