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Editorials |

Childhood Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Unanswered Questions

Carole L. Marcus, MBBCh, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Correspondence to: Carole L. Marcus, MBBCh, FCCP, Pulmonary Division, Fifth Floor Wood, 34th and Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104; e-mail: marcus@email.chop.edu

Dr. Marcus is Professor of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania, and Director, Sleep Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.


Dr. Marcus is receiving research support from Respironics (Murrysville, PA) for an investigator-initiated study on continuous positive airway pressure adherence. She does not believe that this constitutes a conflict of interest with the subject matter of this editorial.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (www.chestjournal.org/misc/reprints.shtml).


Chest. 2008;134(6):1114-1115. doi:10.1378/chest.08-2011
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The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is now recognized to be a common cause of childhood morbidity, occurring in approximately 2% of young children.1 It is associated with a myriad of complications, including neurocognitive dysfunction, poor growth, cardiovascular complications, and inflammatory and metabolic sequelae. In the past, OSAS in children was primarily associated with adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and many of these children had failure to thrive. However, due to the recent childhood obesity epidemic, the children presenting to sleep laboratories are now more likely to be obese. Numerous studies14 have shown an association between obesity and OSAS throughout the age spectrum, from infancy to adulthood.

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