0
Original Research: PLEURAL DISEASE |

Pleural Effusion After Ventricular Assist Device Placement*: Prevalence and Pleural Fluid Characteristics

Ashrith Guha, MD; Sai Munjampalli, MBBS; Venkata Bandi, MD, FCCP; Matthias Loebe, MD; George Noon, MD, FCCP; William Lunn, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From Interventional Pulmonary (Drs. Guha, Munjampalli, Bandi, and Lunn) and Micheal E. DeBakey Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (Drs. Loebe and Noon), Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Correspondence to: William Lunn, MD, FCCP, Director, Interventional Pulmonary, Baylor College of Medicine, 1709 Dryden Rd, Suite 950, Houston, TX 77030; e-mail: wlunn@bcm.tmc.edu



Chest. 2008;134(2):382-386. doi:10.1378/chest.07-2777
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: The occurrence of pleural effusion after ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation has been described; however, little has been elucidated about the nature, prevalence, or characteristics of the effusions. Our study details the prevalence of pleural effusion and pleural fluid characteristics in VAD patients at our institution.

Methods: We conducted a review of 22 consecutive patients undergoing VAD placement from August 2004 to January 2006. The clinical course of pleural effusions and their biochemical characteristics were studied by reviewing the patient charts and radiographs.

Results: Six of the 22 patients (18%) had pleural effusion before VAD placement. All 22 patients had effusions after VAD placement, with the majority being left sided (23%) or bilateral with left-sided predominance (41%). Four patients had large effusion, nine patients had moderate-sized effusions, and nine patients had small effusions. Nine patients (41%) required thoracentesis to relieve dyspnea. All were noted to have blood-tinged pleural fluid, and removal resulted in relief of dyspnea and improvement of clinical status. Seven patients had their pleural fluid examined in detail, and all met criteria for an exudate. No complications were experienced from thoracentesis.

Conclusions: Although pleural effusion is commonly seen in patients after VAD placement, this is the first study to examine the effusions in detail. In our series, pleural effusions developed in all patients, and most were either on the left side or bilateral. Those sampled were exudative in nature, blood tinged, and lymphocyte predominant. Drainage resulted in improvement in symptoms and was accomplished without complications.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543