0
Original Research: COPD |

Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Patients With COPD in the Presence and Absence of Elevated Pulmonary Arterial Pressure*

Georg-Christian Funk, MD; Irene Lang, MD; Peter Schenk, MD; Arschang Valipour, MD; Sylvia Hartl, MD; Otto Chris Burghuber, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (Drs. Funk, Valipour, Hartl, and Burghuber), Otto Wagner Hospital, Vienna, Austria; and the Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Dr. Lang), Division of Cardiology, and the Department of Internal Medicine 3 (Dr. Schenk), Intensive Care Unit 13H1, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Correspondence to: Otto Chris Burghuber, MD, Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Sanatoriumsstraβe 2, A-1140, Vienna, Austria; e-mail: otto.burghuber@wienkav.at



Chest. 2008;133(6):1354-1359. doi:10.1378/chest.07-2685
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Increased right ventricular afterload leads to left ventricular diastolic dysfunction due to ventricular interdependence. Increased right ventricular afterload is frequently present in patients with COPD. The purpose of this study was to determine whether left ventricular diastolic dysfunction could be detected in COPD patients with normal or elevated pulmonary artery pressure (PAP).

Methods: Twenty-two patients with COPD and 22 matched control subjects underwent pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction and other causes of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (eg, coronary artery disease) were excluded in all patients and control subjects. PAP was measured invasively in 13 patients with COPD.

Results: The maximal atrial filling velocity was increased and the early filling velocity was decreased in patients with COPD compared to control subjects. The early flow velocity peak/late flow velocity peak (E/A) ratio was markedly decreased in patients with COPD compared to control subjects (0.79 ± 0.035 vs 1.38 ± 0.069, respectively; p < 0.0001), indicating the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The atrial contribution to total left diastolic filling was increased in patients with COPD. This was also observed in COPD patients with normal PAP, as ascertained using a right heart catheter. The atrial contribution to total left diastolic filling was further increased in COPD patients with PAP. PAP correlated with the E/A ratio (r = −0.85; p < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is present in COPD patients with normal PAP and increases with right ventricular afterload.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543