0
Original Research: AIR TRAVEL |

Definition of Cutoff Values for the Hypoxia Test Used for Preflight Testing in Young Children With Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease*

Andrew C. Martin, MD; Maureen Verheggen, BSc; Stephen M. Stick, PhD; Vaska Stavreska, BSc; Jan Oostryck, BSc; Andrew C. Wilson, MD; Graham L. Hall, PhD
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: *From the School of Paediatrics and Child Health (Dr. Martin, Ms. Verheggen, and Drs. Stick, Wilson, and Hall), University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; and the Princess Margaret Hospital for Children (Ms. Stavreska and Ms. Oostryck), Perth, WA, Australia.,  Joint first authors.

Correspondence to: Andrew Martin, MD, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Roberts Rd, Subiaco, Perth, WA, Australia 6008; e-mail: andrew.martin@health.wa.gov.au



Chest. 2008;133(4):914-919. doi:10.1378/chest.07-1198
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: The hypoxia test can be performed to identify potential hypoxia that might occur in an at-risk individual during air travel. In 2004, the British Thoracic Society increased the hypoxia test cutoff guideline from 85 to 90% in young children. The aim of this study was to investigate how well the cutoff values of 85% and 90% discriminated between healthy children and those with neonatal chronic lung disease (nCLD).

Methods: We performed a prospective, interventional study in young children with nCLD who no longer required supplemental oxygen and healthy control subjects. A hypoxia test (involving the administration of 14% oxygen for 20 min) was performed in all children, and the nadir in pulse oximetric saturation (Spo2) recorded.

Results: Hypoxia test results were obtained in 34 healthy children and 35 children with a history of nCLD. Baseline Spo2 in room air was unable to predict which children would “fail” the hypoxia test. In those children < 2 years of age, applying a cutoff value of 90% resulted in 12 of 24 healthy children and 14 of 23 nCLD children failing the hypoxia test (p = 0.56), whereas a cutoff value of 85% was more discriminating, with only 1 of 24 healthy children and 6 of 23 nCLD children failing the hypoxia test (p = 0.048).

Conclusion: In the present study, using a hypoxia test limit of 90% did not discriminate between healthy children and those with nCLD. A cutoff value of 85% may be more appropriate in this patient group. The clinical relevance of fitness to fly testing in young children remains to be determined.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543