0
Global Medicine |

Socioeconomic Status and Lung Function*

Matthew J. Hegewald, MD, FCCP; Robert O. Crapo, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Pulmonary Division, LDS Hospital and the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

Correspondence to: Matthew J. Hegewald, MD, FCCP, Pulmonary Division, LDS Hospital, Eighth Ave and C St, Salt Lake City, UT 84143; e-mail: matt.hegewald@intermountainmail.org



Chest. 2007;132(5):1608-1614. doi:10.1378/chest.07-1405
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Poverty is a major social problem in the United States and throughout much of the world. Poverty and the broader term socioeconomic status (SES) are important determinants of overall health status and many pulmonary diseases. The purpose of this study was to review the medical literature from the past 20 years addressing the relationship between SES and lung function in both children and adults. There is a significant negative correlation between lung function (primarily FEV1 and FVC) and SES. This relationship exists even after adjusting for smoking status, occupational exposures, and race. The magnitude of the effect of low SES on lung function is variable, but FEV1 reductions of > 300 mL in men and > 200 mL in women have been reported. SES is an important determinant of lung function and an underrecognized contributor to pulmonary disease.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543