0
Original Research: CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE |

Family Satisfaction in the ICU*: Differences Between Families of Survivors and Nonsurvivors

Richard J. Wall, MD, MPH; J. Randall Curtis, MD, MPH, FCCP; Colin R. Cooke, MD, MSc; Ruth A. Engelberg, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Correspondence to: Richard J. Wall, MD, MPH, Harborview Medical Center, 325 Ninth Ave, Box 359762, Seattle, WA 98104; e-mail: brickw@u.washington.edu



Chest. 2007;132(5):1425-1433. doi:10.1378/chest.07-0419
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: We previously noted that the families of patients dying in the ICU reported higher satisfaction with their ICU experience than the families of survivors. However, the reasons for this finding were unclear. In the current study, we sought to confirm these findings and identify specific aspects of care that were rated more highly by the family members of patients dying in the ICU compared to family members of ICU survivors.

Methods: A total of 539 family members with a patient in the ICU were surveyed. Family satisfaction was measured using the 24-item family satisfaction in the ICU questionnaire. Ordinal logistic regression identified which components of family satisfaction were associated with the patient’s outcome (ie, whether the patient lived or died).

Results: A total of 51% of respondents had a loved one die in the ICU. Overall, the families of patients dying in the ICU were more satisfied with their ICU experience than were families of ICU survivors, and the largest differences were noted for care aspects directly affecting family members. Significant differences were found for inclusion in decision making, communication, emotional support, respect and compassion shown to family, and consideration of family needs (p < 0.01).

Conclusions: The families of patients dying in the ICU were more satisfied with their ICU experience than were the families of ICU survivors. The reasons for this difference were higher ratings on family-centered aspects of care. These findings suggest that efforts to improve the support of ICU family members should focus not only on the families of dying patients but also on the families of patients who survive their ICU stay.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543