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Editorials |

Did Lady Windermere Have Cystic Fibrosis?

Bruce K. Rubin, MEngr, MD, MBA, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Winston Salem, NC
 ,  Dr. Rubin is Professor and Vice-Chair, Department of Pediatrics, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Physiology, and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

Correspondence to: Bruce K. Rubin, MEngr, MD, MBA, FCCP, Professor and Vice-Chair, Department of Pediatrics, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Physiology, and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1081; e-mail: brubin@wfubmc.edu



Chest. 2006;130(4):937-938. doi:10.1378/chest.130.4.937
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In 1992, Drs. Jerome Reich and Richard Johnson described six women with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) pulmonary disease presenting with lingular or middle lobe bronchiectasis. They hypothesized that fastidious behavior in these women may have prevented them from expectorating frequently enough to clear their airways of infected secretions and that this predisposed them to the development of bronchiectasis.1 They named this “Lady Windermere syndrome,” after the protagonist of Oscar Wilde’s play Lady Windermere’s Fan, first published in 1892.

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